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are you at university?

did you go back and forth between campus and house?

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When I was at a brick uni, I lived in my own house. So yes there was a lot of travelling back and forth between the campus (for my lectures), and my home. I didn't live very far away though, just 2 miles.
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?


In terms of uni and travel it depends if you're in halls or not or renting with friends. Both times were pretty close and were only a short cycle ride
Not as much now I'm in second year and work part-time but I book time off during reading week and Christmas to go home :smile:
Reply 3
I lived at home, so yes I did go back and forth.
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?

Hi @Herfest

In first year I moved away from home to live on campus, about a 5 minute walk from lectures. This year I live in a flat in Lancaster city centre with my friends and commute into university every day on the bus. I do miss being able to wake up just before my 9am lectures, but I don't find the commute bad, typically I just listen to music or chat quietly to a friend.

Rebecca :smile:
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?

Hi @Herfest

I’m not entirely sure if this answers your question but I am a commuting student who travels from home to my university campus. The commute isn’t long at all, but I do find myself going back and forth when it comes to short lectures and seminars. Sometimes to prevent unnecessary back and forth trips (for example, if I have a couple hours break between lectures) I just go to the library and focus on getting some work on my assignments done.

I hope this helps!

Estelle
Second Year Psychology
University of Huddersfield
Reply 6
Original post by Chronoscope
In terms of uni and travel it depends if you're in halls or not or renting with friends. Both times were pretty close and were only a short cycle ride
Not as much now I'm in second year and work part-time but I book time off during reading week and Christmas to go home :smile:

what uni are you in?
Reply 7
I commuted to one and lived in at the other.

Now I commute to the university each day because I work there.
Reply 8
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi @Herfest

In first year I moved away from home to live on campus, about a 5 minute walk from lectures. This year I live in a flat in Lancaster city centre with my friends and commute into university every day on the bus. I do miss being able to wake up just before my 9am lectures, but I don't find the commute bad, typically I just listen to music or chat quietly to a friend.

Rebecca :smile:

did you have social at my age?

Herfest
Reply 9
Original post by University of Huddersfield
Hi @Herfest

I’m not entirely sure if this answers your question but I am a commuting student who travels from home to my university campus. The commute isn’t long at all, but I do find myself going back and forth when it comes to short lectures and seminars. Sometimes to prevent unnecessary back and forth trips (for example, if I have a couple hours break between lectures) I just go to the library and focus on getting some work on my assignments done.

I hope this helps!

Estelle
Second Year Psychology
University of Huddersfield

i haven't heard Huddersfield in North of England. what's specific of the 'university town'?

Herfest
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?


Hi,
My name is Lily and I’m a 1st year psychology student at Anglia Ruskin !

I’m currently studying from home, and go back and forth from university. I live around 30-40 minutes away from Cambridge, but opt for the park and ride just on the outskirts of the city, this makes travel costs for parking a lot cheaper as well as being stuck in traffic a lot easier. Also if you are concerned about travel costs, I know ARU personally have a travel bursary for people who might be struggling to find for travel. I’m finding the travel perfect and don’t necessarily feel I am missing out on things from the halls, due to my friends around me who are in halls so whenever I’m with them, I get that uni feel for the social side of things. I hope this helps !

Lily
(edited 10 months ago)
Hi,

I'm Rebecca an Education SEN and Mental health student at York St John University.

In my first year, I moved into Student accommodation about a 5-minute walk from campus. I then moved into a house with my friends and now I commute from my family home.

The train links in York are really good so I'm lucky that travelling feels relatively easy. I actually enjoy the train journey and find that I can either get work done or just listen to music.


Rebecca :smile:
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?


Hello @HerfestI currently communte as a student. I am completing my MSc in Psychology at chester university and I find commuting a fantastic balance between socialising and studying and then being able to return home to everything I have always known. It helps me to remain focused and authentic.
I made this decision through previous experience. When i did my undergraduate degree in 2010-2013 i lived away for 3 years, having only returned home for about 4 weeks through the entire time. I was extremely homesick. Due to this, I find that its best to weigh up your emotions before choosing wether to commute or stay in accomadation. :smile:.

All the best,
- Laura
Reply 13
There are loads of greetings! Thank you all. Protected issue? Good social?
I'm music and art one.
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?


Hi @Herfest

I have experienced a few different kinds of accommodation while at uni.

For my undergrad, I was in Trinity Collage Dublin, and lived at home with my parents. I would take public transport (bus) to/from my lectures each day. Unfortunately, even though I wasn’t very far from the uni (maybe a 35 min drive with no traffic) being in the city centre and having a bus route that passes many schools meant that each trip could be over an hour. It wasn’t ideal, but since there is a huge rental crisis in Dublin I didn’t have any choice. It did help me stay motivated to get up in time, and when I learned to manage my time well (i.e. staying in the library to study after lectures so I missed the rush hour traffic, and coming in early to avoid school traffic) it may have actually helped my studies. But it could also be frustrating, ‘wasting’ so much time each day just sitting on a bus.

When I first started my PhD in Cranfield, I lived on campus. This was great, it meant that my commute was only a few minutes walk, and I never had to wait for a bus (even though I didn’t have lectures, I still went to the lab). It was also a great way to get to know people when I had not only moved to a new area, but a whole new country.
I later decided to move in with a friend in Cranfield village, and have rented here since. While it was really nice to have easy and quick access to the lab/office when I lived on campus, it sometimes was hard to create boundaries between my home and work life. Living in the village I have the choice between walking (about 30-45 mins) to campus, or taking the bus (10 mins). Having the option to walk is great, especially when the buses may be less frequent (like on bank holidays), and also means it’s an easy way to get some exercise and time outdoors.

Overall, each option had benefits and drawbacks, but what is best depends on what options you have, your preferences, and your personality.

Hope this helps!
Ciara
3rd year Agrifood PhD student
Cranfield Student Ambassador
Reply 15
I've talked to adult who's been to university already. I've been an art student. Potentially I know what the 'dominent 5th' is. I'm with any major or minor key because I passed in music.
Reply 16
You all thank you for invitation, promotion, or etc.
Hi, I'm currently studying Law and criminology at Sheffield Hallam University.

I live with some friends in a student house around a 10 minute walk to my campus so it is very easy for me to attend lectures and seminars and it also means I can easily use all the university facilities like the library whenever I need to. I'd recommend living as close as you can to your university campus as this means it isn't such a chore to attend and you don't need to motivate yourself too much. Fortunately as the travel links are good In Sheffield, I am also able to travel to my family home fairly often too. This is good for me as I often get a bit home sick while being away at university, so going home can be nice and refreshing which also helps me focus.

Scarlet - Sheffield Hallam University Student Ambassador
Original post by Herfest
did you go back and forth between campus and house?
Reply 18
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi @Herfest

In first year I moved away from home to live on campus, about a 5 minute walk from lectures. This year I live in a flat in Lancaster city centre with my friends and commute into university every day on the bus. I do miss being able to wake up just before my 9am lectures, but I don't find the commute bad, typically I just listen to music or chat quietly to a friend.

Rebecca :smile:

Thank you very much! It's quite simple.
Original post by University of Huddersfield
Hi @Herfest

I’m not entirely sure if this answers your question but I am a commuting student who travels from home to my university campus. The commute isn’t long at all, but I do find myself going back and forth when it comes to short lectures and seminars. Sometimes to prevent unnecessary back and forth trips (for example, if I have a couple hours break between lectures) I just go to the library and focus on getting some work on my assignments done.

I hope this helps!

Estelle
Second Year Psychology
University of Huddersfield

Thank you very much! I haven't heard your university well.
Original post by ARUStudents
Hi,
My name is Lily and I’m a 1st year psychology student at Anglia Ruskin !

I’m currently studying from home, and go back and forth from university. I live around 30-40 minutes away from Cambridge, but opt for the park and ride just on the outskirts of the city, this makes travel costs for parking a lot cheaper as well as being stuck in traffic a lot easier. Also if you are concerned about travel costs, I know ARU personally have a travel bursary for people who might be struggling to find for travel. I’m finding the travel perfect and don’t necessarily feel I am missing out on things from the halls, due to my friends around me who are in halls so whenever I’m with them, I get that uni feel for the social side of things. I hope this helps !

Lily

Thank you very much! It's not remote from Cambridge.
Original post by UniofChester Rep
Hello @HerfestI currently communte as a student. I am completing my MSc in Psychology at chester university and I find commuting a fantastic balance between socialising and studying and then being able to return home to everything I have always known. It helps me to remain focused and authentic.
I made this decision through previous experience. When i did my undergraduate degree in 2010-2013 i lived away for 3 years, having only returned home for about 4 weeks through the entire time. I was extremely homesick. Due to this, I find that its best to weigh up your emotions before choosing wether to commute or stay in accomadation. :smile:.

All the best,
- Laura

Thank you very much!
Original post by Cranfield University
Hi @Herfest

I have experienced a few different kinds of accommodation while at uni.

For my undergrad, I was in Trinity Collage Dublin, and lived at home with my parents. I would take public transport (bus) to/from my lectures each day. Unfortunately, even though I wasn’t very far from the uni (maybe a 35 min drive with no traffic) being in the city centre and having a bus route that passes many schools meant that each trip could be over an hour. It wasn’t ideal, but since there is a huge rental crisis in Dublin I didn’t have any choice. It did help me stay motivated to get up in time, and when I learned to manage my time well (i.e. staying in the library to study after lectures so I missed the rush hour traffic, and coming in early to avoid school traffic) it may have actually helped my studies. But it could also be frustrating, ‘wasting’ so much time each day just sitting on a bus.

When I first started my PhD in Cranfield, I lived on campus. This was great, it meant that my commute was only a few minutes walk, and I never had to wait for a bus (even though I didn’t have lectures, I still went to the lab). It was also a great way to get to know people when I had not only moved to a new area, but a whole new country.
I later decided to move in with a friend in Cranfield village, and have rented here since. While it was really nice to have easy and quick access to the lab/office when I lived on campus, it sometimes was hard to create boundaries between my home and work life. Living in the village I have the choice between walking (about 30-45 mins) to campus, or taking the bus (10 mins). Having the option to walk is great, especially when the buses may be less frequent (like on bank holidays), and also means it’s an easy way to get some exercise and time outdoors.

Overall, each option had benefits and drawbacks, but what is best depends on what options you have, your preferences, and your personality.

Hope this helps!
Ciara
3rd year Agrifood PhD student
Cranfield Student Ambassador

Thank you very much! It's got good military.
Reply 19
Does Music Art or EFL skill fulfill the requirement?

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