The Student Room Group

Daughters graduation at Cambridge

I just wonder when students whose parents are divorced but have both remarried , why aren’t both sets of parents given tickets (4 tickets in total) After all both parents have most likely invested and helped with their child’s university expenses yet if they can only get 3 tickets maximum then surely it’s unfair to leave someone out, leaving possibly one step parent feeling a little unhappy and disappointed!?
It is time modern day family life is considered perhaps?
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 1
Original post by davidswadkins65
I just wonder when students whose parents are divorced but have both remarried , why aren’t both sets of parents given tickets (4 tickets in total) After all both parents have most likely invested and helped with their child’s university expenses yet if they can only get 3 tickets maximum then surely it’s unfair to leave someone out, leaving possibly one step parent feeling a little unhappy and disappointed!?
It is time modern day family life is considered perhaps?

Most unis only allow two tickets - why should divorced parents get more? You could argue siblings have a better claim than a step-parent.
I accept that, but some step parents do an awful lot towards their stepchildren’s upbringing, not least financially but in other ways and to not be able to see them graduate can feel harsh.
Reply 3
Maybe it’s about the amount of space available in the ancient graduations ceremony venues, and mostly people hate their step parents anyway
(edited 10 months ago)
Yes I suppose they may do, especially if they are selfish, spoilt, have never worked a day in their lives, have no children, no common sense and no respect, which probably sounds familiar to you.
So probably does make me wonder why some step parents actually care about their adopted brats in the first place, because it’s take take take from so many of them!
Maybe when they earn a living and are responsible for themselves they may begin to understand.
Original post by davidswadkins65
I just wonder when students whose parents are divorced but have both remarried , why aren’t both sets of parents given tickets (4 tickets in total) After all both parents have most likely invested and helped with their child’s university expenses yet if they can only get 3 tickets maximum then surely it’s unfair to leave someone out, leaving possibly one step parent feeling a little unhappy and disappointed!?
It is time modern day family life is considered perhaps?

Because the venues don't magically grow in size to accommodate this? They have fixed capacities and they need to accommodate all students. Others can certainly come into town and spend the day with them (it's quite common for some students to have a lot of their extended family travel to Cambridge for the day) but there are only so many people who can fit into the actual location where the graduation ceremony itself takes place.

Your proposal would more than likely lead to actual students being left out to accommodate those who happen to have larger immediate families - do you think that's fair?
(edited 10 months ago)
Original post by davidswadkins65
Oh sorry, my original post was actually a question and not a proposal. However as Universities do tend to evolve and grow maybe it could consider developing larger graduation venues? quote]

Not so much in the real world where you think Cambridge can simply find a bigger place than Senate House for graduations! Maybe attend first, do the gentlemanly thing and wait outside, and then ask your daughter and assorted parents about the practicalities and traditions.

Senate House is too small to accommodate more than 3 guests per student. It's not just divorced and remarried parents, it's also families with more than two siblings, students who have parents and children of their own, in fact all sorts of combinations of 'family'. I'm sure, in fact, this issue is constantly in the mind of the organisers, but the decision is currently that the traditional location and process of graduation for students is more important than some specific family issues.
Original post by davidswadkins65
Oh sorry, my original post was actually a question and not a proposal. However as Universities do tend to evolve and grow maybe it could consider developing larger graduation venues?!

Not sure if you've spent much time in the real world of Cambridge, but pretty much 90% of the city centre is listed buildings, and what isn't listed has probably 20 years worth of planning permission already, minimum - the university literally builds buildings while putting in planning permission for what will replace it 10-20 years later. Even the West Site has every square inch allotted to pre-existing planned buildings which have had planning permission etc already put in place.

Even supposing by some wave of hypothetical wands you were able to conjure some fresh, untouched land in Cambridge that could be built on - why would the uni build something extremely low yield like a venue for graduations which happen half a dozen times a year, when they could build accommodation, new departmental buildings, new office space, etc, all of which either earns them money or saves them money. In the real world the university is a business thanks to the pressures of certain political elements, and they aren't going to do something just so they get a few extra people into a graduation ceremony which costs more money to hold in the first place than it makes.
(edited 10 months ago)
Reply 8
Original post by davidswadkins65
It seems my original question has stirred a hornet’s nest for some reason, when I was merely asking a question, however lesson learned, some academics need to be sarcastic to sound clever, others are just damn right rude. It’s a shame when Cambridge is such a lovely place.


I don’t think that you’ve stirred up a hornet’s nest, but quite simply the answer of lack of space was so obvious in a city such as Cambridge that people are just flabbergasted that it didn’t cross your mind! I understand reasoning behind your question, and the solution would be to organise a celebratory meal after the ceremony for all the family members. This is of course providing that all factions can rest civil so as not to ruin the graduates day!
Reply 9
Obvious if you live in Cambridge, otherwise I wouldn’t have posted my question, there just wasn’t any need for rudeness or sarcasm.


(Original post by Euapp)I don’t think that you’ve stirred up a hornet’s nest, but quite simply the answer of lack of space was so obvious in a city such as Cambridge that people are just flabbergasted that it didn’t cross your mind! I understand reasoning behind your question, and the solution would be to organise a celebratory meal after the ceremony for all the family members. This is of course providing that all factions can rest civil so as not to ruin the graduates day!
Reply 10
Original post by Anonymous
Obvious if you live in Cambridge, otherwise I wouldn’t have posted my question, there just wasn’t any need for rudeness or sarcasm.


(Original post by Euapp)I don’t think that you’ve stirred up a hornet’s nest, but quite simply the answer of lack of space was so obvious in a city such as Cambridge that people are just flabbergasted that it didn’t cross your mind! I understand reasoning behind your question, and the solution would be to organise a celebratory meal after the ceremony for all the family members. This is of course providing that all factions can rest civil so as not to ruin the graduates day!


I wasn’t trying to be sarcastic and apologise if I came across as rude but people’s reactions really were because the space constraint seemed so obvious.If it wasn’t for this I’m sure that the graduation ceremony would be open to all who wished to attend, and I can quite understand your reasoning and frustration at it not being possible. But for context I don’t live in Cambridge, In fact I don’t even live in the UK.

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