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Plagiarism meeting

Hi , so basically I’m in my final year of uni and I just received an email saying the marker has raised once ends about my work in relation to malpractice but I haven’t recieved anymore information. I am extremely worried as it’s my final year , I haven’t copied any work or provided any work to anyone although I have discussed ideas and basis of the work with others however I never sent them my work or anything. Am i in trouble ? Idk how to react or what to do!
Reply 1
While you're waiting, you should check out your university's Academic Misconduct procedure - that will explain in detail what happens once suspected academic misconduct is flagged. Remember that academic misconduct can mean a number of things, and sometimes captures poor academic practice, especially if happening at L6 when it is reasonably assumed that students know what they're doing.
You know the piece of work that has been referred, so perhaps have a look through it again to see what might have triggered this. Has some of the material included gone unreferenced, for example. You mention discussing your work with other students who presumably were taking the same assessment - how detailed were those discussions?
Anxiety levels will be high while you wait for this to pan out - so seek advice at the SU if you need support.
Reply 2
Original post by cheadle
While you're waiting, you should check out your university's Academic Misconduct procedure - that will explain in detail what happens once suspected academic misconduct is flagged. Remember that academic misconduct can mean a number of things, and sometimes captures poor academic practice, especially if happening at L6 when it is reasonably assumed that students know what they're doing.
You know the piece of work that has been referred, so perhaps have a look through it again to see what might have triggered this. Has some of the material included gone unreferenced, for example. You mention discussing your work with other students who presumably were taking the same assessment - how detailed were those discussions?
Anxiety levels will be high while you wait for this to pan out - so seek advice at the SU if you need support.


we had discussions about methods and how to go about things and structure of the assignment etc but I think maybe because our structure is similar that’s why it’s been flagged up and as we discussed things we probably raises same points within the assignment which has raised questions. I’m not sure if that classes as collusion etc I’m just really stressed and unsure how to go about things
Reply 3
Is there any way you can find out of any of the people you mention have also been notified that they are being investigated? That would clarify if suspected collusion is the issue.
Reply 4
Original post by cheadle
Is there any way you can find out of any of the people you mention have also been notified that they are being investigated? That would clarify if suspected collusion is the issue.

Yes the other person has also been notified
Original post by Bansnan
Hi , so basically I’m in my final year of uni and I just received an email saying the marker has raised once ends about my work in relation to malpractice but I haven’t recieved anymore information. I am extremely worried as it’s my final year , I haven’t copied any work or provided any work to anyone although I have discussed ideas and basis of the work with others however I never sent them my work or anything. Am i in trouble ? Idk how to react or what to do!

Hey!
I understand that receiving an email regarding malpractice concerns can be quite alarming and stressful, especially in your final year of university. First of all, it's important not to panic. Sometimes, emails like this can be generated due to misunderstandings or miscommunications. It's crucial to gather more information to understand the exact nature of the concern. Typically, the email you received should provide you with some details or instructions on how to proceed.

Here are a few steps you can take:

Read the email carefully: Go through the email you received and try to understand the specific allegations or concerns. Take note of any instructions given, such as whom to contact or what documents to provide.

Contact the sender: If the email lacks specific details, reach out to the sender for clarification. You can reply to the email or find contact information for the relevant department or individual mentioned. Politely explain your confusion and request more information about the specific allegations against you.

Gather evidence: While you mentioned not having copied or shared your work, it may be helpful to gather any evidence that supports your claim. This can include notes, drafts, timestamps, or any other relevant material that shows the development and originality of your work.

Seek guidance: Reach out to your academic advisor, a faculty member, or a student support service at your university. They can provide valuable guidance and support during this process. They may also have experience dealing with similar situations and can help you navigate the next steps.

Stay calm and focused: It's natural to feel anxious about this situation, but try to stay calm and focused on gathering information and resolving the issue. Avoid making assumptions or jumping to conclusions until you have all the facts.

Remember, every university has its own procedures for handling cases of academic malpractice. By seeking clarification and following the proper channels, you'll have a better understanding of the situation and how to address it appropriately.

Best of luck, and I hope this situation gets resolved quickly and positively for you.

Best Wishes
Priya :smile:
Postgraduate Ambassador
University of Southampton
Reply 6
Original post by UoS PG students
Hey!
I understand that receiving an email regarding malpractice concerns can be quite alarming and stressful, especially in your final year of university. First of all, it's important not to panic. Sometimes, emails like this can be generated due to misunderstandings or miscommunications. It's crucial to gather more information to understand the exact nature of the concern. Typically, the email you received should provide you with some details or instructions on how to proceed.

Here are a few steps you can take:

Read the email carefully: Go through the email you received and try to understand the specific allegations or concerns. Take note of any instructions given, such as whom to contact or what documents to provide.

Contact the sender: If the email lacks specific details, reach out to the sender for clarification. You can reply to the email or find contact information for the relevant department or individual mentioned. Politely explain your confusion and request more information about the specific allegations against you.

Gather evidence: While you mentioned not having copied or shared your work, it may be helpful to gather any evidence that supports your claim. This can include notes, drafts, timestamps, or any other relevant material that shows the development and originality of your work.

Seek guidance: Reach out to your academic advisor, a faculty member, or a student support service at your university. They can provide valuable guidance and support during this process. They may also have experience dealing with similar situations and can help you navigate the next steps.

Stay calm and focused: It's natural to feel anxious about this situation, but try to stay calm and focused on gathering information and resolving the issue. Avoid making assumptions or jumping to conclusions until you have all the facts.

Remember, every university has its own procedures for handling cases of academic malpractice. By seeking clarification and following the proper channels, you'll have a better understanding of the situation and how to address it appropriately.

Best of luck, and I hope this situation gets resolved quickly and positively for you.

Best Wishes
Priya :smile:
Postgraduate Ambassador
University of Southampton

Hi , my friend also recieved the email and we discussed topics etc but never sent work just spoke about the issues in the assignment I think it maybe because our structure and points mentioned were similar based off this would you say I would be penalised?
Reply 7
Original post by UoS PG students
Hey!
I understand that receiving an email regarding malpractice concerns can be quite alarming and stressful, especially in your final year of university. First of all, it's important not to panic. Sometimes, emails like this can be generated due to misunderstandings or miscommunications. It's crucial to gather more information to understand the exact nature of the concern. Typically, the email you received should provide you with some details or instructions on how to proceed.

Here are a few steps you can take:

Read the email carefully: Go through the email you received and try to understand the specific allegations or concerns. Take note of any instructions given, such as whom to contact or what documents to provide.

Contact the sender: If the email lacks specific details, reach out to the sender for clarification. You can reply to the email or find contact information for the relevant department or individual mentioned. Politely explain your confusion and request more information about the specific allegations against you.

Gather evidence: While you mentioned not having copied or shared your work, it may be helpful to gather any evidence that supports your claim. This can include notes, drafts, timestamps, or any other relevant material that shows the development and originality of your work.

Seek guidance: Reach out to your academic advisor, a faculty member, or a student support service at your university. They can provide valuable guidance and support during this process. They may also have experience dealing with similar situations and can help you navigate the next steps.

Stay calm and focused: It's natural to feel anxious about this situation, but try to stay calm and focused on gathering information and resolving the issue. Avoid making assumptions or jumping to conclusions until you have all the facts.

Remember, every university has its own procedures for handling cases of academic malpractice. By seeking clarification and following the proper channels, you'll have a better understanding of the situation and how to address it appropriately.

Best of luck, and I hope this situation gets resolved quickly and positively for you.

Best Wishes
Priya :smile:
Postgraduate Ambassador
University of Southampton

The email said there’s an initial investigation ongoing and if there’s malpractice then evidence etc will be provided and if there’s no malpractice then the case is dropped.
Reply 8
Original post by Bansnan
Hi , my friend also recieved the email and we discussed topics etc but never sent work just spoke about the issues in the assignment I think it maybe because our structure and points mentioned were similar based off this would you say I would be penalised?

It's impossible to say without comparing the two assignments. But there must be enough similarity for this to have been picked up. I think you're just going to have to sit this out till you know the outcome of the preliminary investigation.
Reply 9
Original post by cheadle
It's impossible to say without comparing the two assignments. But there must be enough similarity for this to have been picked up. I think you're just going to have to sit this out till you know the outcome of the preliminary investigation.

Yeah most likely , it’s just the wait that’s agonising. If I get called to a meeting is it most likely that I’ll be in trouble or is there still a chance I could be let off
Reply 10
The waiting is agony but something that just has to be endured. If things progress, you should definitely defend yourself but at the same time I think you should be upfront about having had a discussion with your fellow student about the assignment. That in itself is not necessarily collusion. You would have to wait to see the evidence which would be presented to you at a subsequent meeting, and you would be asked to explain it. If you could reflect upon what might have stood out when the two assignments were compared, that might be helpful. You keep asking what the outcome might be but honestly impossible to say.
(edited 9 months ago)

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