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Can I get a Post-Graduate Physics degree after PPE?

Earlier this year, I got an offer from Oxford for PPE (AAA). I am intereseted in those subjects however, I also have a great interest in Physics and previously thought about getting my undergraduate in Physics. Is there any way that after I get my PPE degree, after a few years, I can apply for MPhil or MASt in Physics at Cambridge? For reference, my A-levels subjects were Physics, History, Mathematics, Economics and English Literature and I am predicted A*'s in all apart from English Literature in which I'm predicted an A. I don't however want to spend an additional 3 years getting another undergraduate degree in Physics(or Natural Sciences) but instead want a shorter alternative. I would however be willing to take a shorter course of 1 year and a half or less.
(edited 7 months ago)
Original post by NicolaePaulescu
Earlier this year, I got an offer from Oxford for PPE (AAA). I am intereseted in those subjects however, I also have a great interest in Physics and previously thought about getting my undergraduate in Physics. Is there any way that after I get my PPE degree, after a few years, I can apply for MPhil or MASt in Physics at Cambridge? For reference, my A-levels subjects were Physics, History, Mathematics, Economics and English Literature and I am predicted A*'s in all apart from English Literature in which I'm predicted an A. I don't however want to spend an additional 3 years getting another undergraduate degree in Physics(or Natural Sciences) but instead want a shorter alternative. I would however be willing to take a shorter course of 1 year and a half or less.

University level physics is way more advanced than A level, and taking a Masters in physics would require a solid background in University level physics. Going straight from PPE into a Physics Masters degree program would be unlikely. However, you may want to consider an Open University degree in Physics or a part-time course in somewhere like Birkbeck, before applying to take a Masters. In practice by the the time you graduate and begin a full time job, find somewhere to live and have to start paying council tax, other considerations tend to fall by the wayside. See how you feel in three years time. You may have had enough of University life by then.
Original post by BetaVersion2.9
University level physics is way more advanced than A level, and taking a Masters in physics would require a solid background in University level physics. Going straight from PPE into a Physics Masters degree program would be unlikely. However, you may want to consider an Open University degree in Physics or a part-time course in somewhere like Birkbeck, before applying to take a Masters. In practice by the the time you graduate and begin a full time job, find somewhere to live and have to start paying council tax, other considerations tend to fall by the wayside. See how you feel in three years time. You may have had enough of University life by then.


Do any other university in England or even Europe offer a part-time course? I have no problem relocating.
Original post by NicolaePaulescu
Do any other university in England or even Europe offer a part-time course? I have no problem relocating.

KCL and Sussex Uni are two that used to offer part-time masters in physics.
Reply 4
Original post by NicolaePaulescu
Earlier this year, I got an offer from Oxford for PPE (AAA). I am intereseted in those subjects however, I also have a great interest in Physics and previously thought about getting my undergraduate in Physics. Is there any way that after I get my PPE degree, after a few years, I can apply for MPhil or MASt in Physics at Cambridge? For reference, my A-levels subjects were Physics, History, Mathematics, Economics and English Literature and I am predicted A*'s in all apart from English Literature in which I'm predicted an A. I don't however want to spend an additional 3 years getting another undergraduate degree in Physics(or Natural Sciences) but instead want a shorter alternative. I would however be willing to take a shorter course of 1 year and a half or less.


Universities say what their subject and grade requirements are for specific programmes on their websites - search for a few Physics Master's listings at different universities and they will say if they require a Physics BSc.

Cambridge's Physics MASt says: "Applicants for this course should have achieved a UK High 2.1 Honours Degree....due to the high standard of applications this course receives, the typical grade of candidates who are admitted is a high First class Honours degree (or equivalent) in Physics. Students require excellent working knowledge in core physics courses including Quantum Mechanics, Condensed Matter Physics, Thermal and Statistical Physics, Electrodynamic.'

So a Physics BSc isn't essential, but it is strongly implied that one is beneficial for the applications.

The Cambridge Physics MPhil simply says "Applicants for this course should have achieved a UK Good 2.1 Honours Degree" - no subject specified.

Different universities will have different requirements. It's always worth getting in touch with their programme admissions team to ask for any clarification.
(edited 7 months ago)
No, effectively. You won't have covered basically any of the topics required. You won't even have covered all the necessary mathematical content of a physics degree.

KCL used to have a part-time diploma course that could allow you to take undergraduate physics modules as part of a PGDip as a "conversion", but this was really designed for those from e.g. engineering or CS or other physical science backgrounds who had more mathematics and at least some physical science content in their degree.

The MASt in Physics at Cambridge is designed for graduates in physics, maths, or closely aligned areas like materials science. I really doubt even engineering graduates would have suitable background for that course.

If you want to do a physics masters you should apply to do a physics undergraduate degree.

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