The Student Room Group

Psychology apprenticeship

Hiya guys I was just wondering if there was any way I could do a job that involves psychology without uni since I don’t think uni is for me
You could work in a psychology related setting, such as a hospital, but you'd struggle to find a job directly in psychology without at least an undergraduate degree
As the poster above said, you usually need a degree in psychology. Why do you think that uni isn't for you? It'd be a shame if you didn't pursue psychology because you don't feel like university is for you, without actually knowing for sure! So please answer and let's see if we can help you with any university concerns you might have :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by AHS102
Hiya guys I was just wondering if there was any way I could do a job that involves psychology without uni since I don’t think uni is for me


When you say "a job that involves psychology", what do you mean? You can train as a counsellor or psychotherapist without needing a degree, if you are interested in the therapeutic work with clients/patients, though this still involves studying at a college or training centre and will take just as long as a degree (maybe longer).
Reply 4
Original post by bones-mccoy
You could work in a psychology related setting, such as a hospital, but you'd struggle to find a job directly in psychology without at least an undergraduate degree

I’m planning on becoming a counsellors after doing some research on it and all I need to do is a counselling course without uni xx
Thank you for the reply bones-McCoy
Reply 5
Original post by Scotland Yard
As the poster above said, you usually need a degree in psychology. Why do you think that uni isn't for you? It'd be a shame if you didn't pursue psychology because you don't feel like university is for you, without actually knowing for sure! So please answer and let's see if we can help you with any university concerns you might have :smile:

First and foremost, thank you for you reply Scotland Yard

i know Uni isn’t for me because I didn’t quite enjoy gsce and am finding a levels okay. I don’t know how to explain it but it’s more of an intuition feeling that uni isn’t meant for me. I know I can do well in uni but I don’t think it’s the path that’s right for me if you undertsand wat I mean. After some consideration I’m planning on becoming a counsellor which doesn’t require a degree xxx
Reply 6
Original post by Nerol
When you say "a job that involves psychology", what do you mean? You can train as a counsellor or psychotherapist without needing a degree, if you are interested in the therapeutic work with clients/patients, though this still involves studying at a college or training centre and will take just as long as a degree (maybe longer).

Yes this is exactly what i want to do, if I want to become a counsellor I might as well go to a training centre and save money rather than pay a lot of student loans. Plus since becoming a psychologist requires a doctorate (from what I’ve seen on prospectus) I don’t want to spend majority of my time in uni. Rather I would like to get it over and done with and just do the job. I know it won’t be easy but for me personally the counsellor trainin route is more ideal for me.

And thank you so much for your reply nerol xxx
Reply 7
Original post by AHS102
Yes this is exactly what i want to do, if I want to become a counsellor I might as well go to a training centre and save money rather than pay a lot of student loans. Plus since becoming a psychologist requires a doctorate (from what I’ve seen on prospectus) I don’t want to spend majority of my time in uni. Rather I would like to get it over and done with and just do the job. I know it won’t be easy but for me personally the counsellor trainin route is more ideal for me.

And thank you so much for your reply nerol xxx


No problem at all! You could look into level 2/3 counselling courses at local colleges. You could do level 2 online, but level 3 and up will require face-to-face training. Level 4 involves doing placement hours, so you work while you learn. You can then do further training in future in different therapies if you wish (e.g., I just finished training as a high intensity CBT therapist, which was a paid trainee role through the NHS, paid at band 6 while training and moving up to band 7 once qualified - same as for a clinical psychologist). I'd definitely recommend it!
Reply 8
Original post by Nerol
No problem at all! You could look into level 2/3 counselling courses at local colleges. You could do level 2 online, but level 3 and up will require face-to-face training. Level 4 involves doing placement hours, so you work while you learn. You can then do further training in future in different therapies if you wish (e.g., I just finished training as a high intensity CBT therapist, which was a paid trainee role through the NHS, paid at band 6 while training and moving up to band 7 once qualified - same as for a clinical psychologist). I'd definitely recommend it!

Ooh that’s fantastic, congratulations on your achievement, I was wondering about doing the CPTA counselling level 2 course. Do you think they’re a good place to study?
Many thanks for your answer xx
Reply 9
Original post by AHS102
Ooh that’s fantastic, congratulations on your achievement, I was wondering about doing the CPTA counselling level 2 course. Do you think they’re a good place to study?
Many thanks for your answer xx

I don't know about that course, but with level 2 I don't think it matters so much as it is a short, introductory course. I didn't even do a level 2 course tbh because my degree was in Psychology and Counselling. Any level 2 course you like the look of should be fine for helping you gain a place on a level 3 course afterwards.
Reply 10
Original post by Nerol
I don't know about that course, but with level 2 I don't think it matters so much as it is a short, introductory course. I didn't even do a level 2 course tbh because my degree was in Psychology and Counselling. Any level 2 course you like the look of should be fine for helping you gain a place on a level 3 course afterwards.

Okay thank you so much for your reply and help nerol xxx
Reply 11
Original post by Nerol
No problem at all! You could look into level 2/3 counselling courses at local colleges. You could do level 2 online, but level 3 and up will require face-to-face training. Level 4 involves doing placement hours, so you work while you learn. You can then do further training in future in different therapies if you wish (e.g., I just finished training as a high intensity CBT therapist, which was a paid trainee role through the NHS, paid at band 6 while training and moving up to band 7 once qualified - same as for a clinical psychologist). I'd definitely recommend it!
Hi dyu have any further information on ur course xx

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