The Student Room Group

Why is Uni life so hard?

I did a presentation for my first class and it was supposed to last 10-15 minutes I barely talked for 6 minutes, I was stuttering BAD, and definitely nervous. I might get a bad grade. How could I have made it longer? Loll.

My presentation was on Labeling Theory.
Also, how's everyone handling the Uni life so far? Cause my personally I'm ready to drop out!!!!!
* Pause more. Relax. Don't rush.
* Practice - use index cards to ensure you're covering the main points but don't just read a powerpoint slide. They can do this for themselves.
* Tell them what you're going to tell them. Tell them. Tell them what you've told them.
i.e. Introduce the topic and where it fits in the subject you're studying, explain the main points and some of the minor ones too, then recap and ask for questions.

e.g. My talk this morning relates to a particular theory which has been used to explain a variety of social behaviour among groups, including deviant criminal behaviour. It's called Labelling Theory and it states that the behaviour of human beings is influenced significantly by the way other members in society label them. The term was first used by Howard Becker in 1963 and was seen as just stating the obvious but someone was getting paid a lot to come up to just re-hash a load of common sense and stick an academic tag on it.

One of the central features is the way it revolves around the concept of the self-fulfilling prophecy, i.e. a prediction that causes itself to become true.
Therefore, the process by which a person’s expectations about someone can lead to that someone behaving in ways that confirm the expectations.
An example of a self-fulfilling prophecy is the placebo effect when a person experiences beneficial outcomes because
they expect an inactive “look-alike” substance or treatment to work, even though it has no known medical effect.

In the classroom, a self-fulfilling prophecy occurs when a teacher holds expectations for students, which through social interaction, causes the students to behave in such a manner as to confirm the originally false (but now true) expectation. For example, lower expectations for students from disadvantaged backgrounds and higher expectations for middle-class students.

There are two types of self-fulfilling prophecies: Self-imposed prophecies occur when your own expectations influence your actions. Other-imposed prophecies occur when others’ expectations influence your behaviour. All opinions you value can cause this prophecy.

The Pygmalion effect is a type of other-imposed self-fulfilling prophecy that states the way you treat someone has a direct impact on how that person acts. If another person thinks something will happen, they may consciously or unconsciously make it happen through their actions or inaction.

One of the major flaws often levelled at the theory is the way in which it ignores self-determination etc etc etc.

(Look at https://www.simplypsychology.org/labeling-theory.html for more info !!)

Don't try and write a speech. Learn your subject, make bullet points around which you feel comfortable speaking. Then time yourself. You will become more confident in what you are saying, the umms and aahs will decrease and your audience will believe you know your subject.

Good Luck
Reply 2
Original post by SomeonesDad
* Pause more. Relax. Don't rush.
* Practice - use index cards to ensure you're covering the main points but don't just read a powerpoint slide. They can do this for themselves.
* Tell them what you're going to tell them. Tell them. Tell them what you've told them.
i.e. Introduce the topic and where it fits in the subject you're studying, explain the main points and some of the minor ones too, then recap and ask for questions.

e.g. My talk this morning relates to a particular theory which has been used to explain a variety of social behaviour among groups, including deviant criminal behaviour. It's called Labelling Theory and it states that the behaviour of human beings is influenced significantly by the way other members in society label them. The term was first used by Howard Becker in 1963 and was seen as just stating the obvious but someone was getting paid a lot to come up to just re-hash a load of common sense and stick an academic tag on it.

One of the central features is the way it revolves around the concept of the self-fulfilling prophecy, i.e. a prediction that causes itself to become true.
Therefore, the process by which a person’s expectations about someone can lead to that someone behaving in ways that confirm the expectations.
An example of a self-fulfilling prophecy is the placebo effect when a person experiences beneficial outcomes because
they expect an inactive “look-alike” substance or treatment to work, even though it has no known medical effect.

In the classroom, a self-fulfilling prophecy occurs when a teacher holds expectations for students, which through social interaction, causes the students to behave in such a manner as to confirm the originally false (but now true) expectation. For example, lower expectations for students from disadvantaged backgrounds and higher expectations for middle-class students.

There are two types of self-fulfilling prophecies: Self-imposed prophecies occur when your own expectations influence your actions. Other-imposed prophecies occur when others’ expectations influence your behaviour. All opinions you value can cause this prophecy.

The Pygmalion effect is a type of other-imposed self-fulfilling prophecy that states the way you treat someone has a direct impact on how that person acts. If another person thinks something will happen, they may consciously or unconsciously make it happen through their actions or inaction.

One of the major flaws often levelled at the theory is the way in which it ignores self-determination etc etc etc.

(Look at https://www.simplypsychology.org/labeling-theory.html for more info !!)

Don't try and write a speech. Learn your subject, make bullet points around which you feel comfortable speaking. Then time yourself. You will become more confident in what you are saying, the umms and aahs will decrease and your audience will believe you know your subject.

Good Luck

Oh wowww! That's actually amazing advice and I will make sure to use it next time when I have a presentation due!! Thank you!

I do wish I knew this earlier because I would've done better without a doubt... :frown:
Original post by nova.a5
Oh wowww! That's actually amazing advice and I will make sure to use it next time when I have a presentation due!! Thank you!

I do wish I knew this earlier because I would've done better without a doubt... :frown:


You are very much welcome. Good luck in your course & future career.
Original post by nova.a5
I did a presentation for my first class and it was supposed to last 10-15 minutes I barely talked for 6 minutes, I was stuttering BAD, and definitely nervous. I might get a bad grade. How could I have made it longer? Loll.

My presentation was on Labeling Theory.
Also, how's everyone handling the Uni life so far? Cause my personally I'm ready to drop out!!!!!


Hi @nova.a5

You've received some amazing advice above but I just wanted to reassure you that the first month of university will feel alien and crazy and that is totally normal. It does settle down a bit and then suddenly you wont even remember life before university!

I got very lucky that my degree doesn't require too many presentations but it's pretty common for your first everything (presentation/essay/exam) to be kind of a flop because everything is new - but the good news is you learn from it and your second time round will go much more smoothly. :smile:

Good luck with university!
Rebecca (Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Reply 5
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi @nova.a5

You've received some amazing advice above but I just wanted to reassure you that the first month of university will feel alien and crazy and that is totally normal. It does settle down a bit and then suddenly you wont even remember life before university!

I got very lucky that my degree doesn't require too many presentations but it's pretty common for your first everything (presentation/essay/exam) to be kind of a flop because everything is new - but the good news is you learn from it and your second time round will go much more smoothly. :smile:

Good luck with university!
Rebecca (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

That is so true, and I have noticed that as well. This was my first presentation and I am a 3rd year Uni student so it was definetely new for me. You're right, it gets better as I go on. Thank you for your kind words and ecouragment. :smile:

Quick Reply

Latest