The Student Room Group

What do you think?

Should placement/working hours stop you from pursuing a dream career?

I’ve always wanted to be a midwife, but still haven’t taken the route. I’m a teacher, and decided to go down this route as my children were very young when I returned to education plus I had other issues.

Those issues are resolved, and I really really want to pursue my midwifery dream, but I’m scared about the placement hours.

I’ve tried to stop myself from thinking about midwifery, but I can’t shake it off
Original post by Smiley91
Should placement/working hours stop you from pursuing a dream career?

I’ve always wanted to be a midwife, but still haven’t taken the route. I’m a teacher, and decided to go down this route as my children were very young when I returned to education plus I had other issues.

Those issues are resolved, and I really really want to pursue my midwifery dream, but I’m scared about the placement hours.

I’ve tried to stop myself from thinking about midwifery, but I can’t shake it off


Hi @Smiley91

I could not let this question pass me by!

Definitely go for it!! You will only regret it if you don't. If you have that desire within you, that will be enough to get you through the placement hours. Yes it will be tough, but the training and the placement will come to an end and you will be working as a midwife before you know it.

You're a teacher, they can deal with pretty much anything. I wish you all the best and I hope that you pursue midwifery!

Anastasia
BCU Student Rep
Reply 2
Thank you. I really appreciate this.

My sister said the same - and I think it’s about time I take the leap! Time will fly..
Reply 3
Original post by Smiley91
Should placement/working hours stop you from pursuing a dream career?

I’ve always wanted to be a midwife, but still haven’t taken the route. I’m a teacher, and decided to go down this route as my children were very young when I returned to education plus I had other issues.

Those issues are resolved, and I really really want to pursue my midwifery dream, but I’m scared about the placement hours.

I’ve tried to stop myself from thinking about midwifery, but I can’t shake it off


Hi

I'm going to echo what BCU Student Rep said in post #2.

Don't worry about the hours you'll be doing on placemats because you're probably already working long hours as a teacher both at school and home. You'll be doing at least a 12.5/13 hour shift over 3 days per week with 4 days off. You'll certainly get use to working those hours and the different shift patterns ( weekend, Nightshift and dayshift) but worth it at the end of your degree. You have to work a average 37.5 hours per week for both university studying block weeks and also when doing your placement either at hospital or the community.
Just to say community working is different from the hospital as you normally work between Monday and Friday with a day of in the week plus free weekends unlike hospital maternity units you'll be working long hours.

If you are 110% sure about jumping into being a midwife then don't hesitate in going for it as if you don't do it now you'll never do it..... Just remember when you apply for the midwife degree you'll be up against thousands upon thousands of other candidates for such limited amount of places available at each university in the UK because of the intensity of the training. In my country of the UK we only have 3 universities for midwife degree courses and they only take in around 250 potential students between them each year and this makes it very highly competitive. You may have to apply a few times but don't give up on becoming a midwife if this is your dream. I could suggest to you that you could apply for a job position as a MCA (maternity care assistant) as you'll be basically trained in every aspect of the midwife job roles working alongside the qualified midwives but you'll not be able to do any births as this is midwives place only if you don't get into university next year. Then you can always apply for university using your maternity care assistant role as your experience.


I always wanted to do adult nursing first and then eventually go down the 18/20 months shortened midwife top-up degree course but I eventually got offered a midwife place at university which saved me going back to university. I'm now just over 4 years qualified.


NHS registered midwife
Reply 4
Original post by Tracey_W
Hi

I'm going to echo what BCU Student Rep said in post #2.

Don't worry about the hours you'll be doing on placemats because you're probably already working long hours as a teacher both at school and home. You'll be doing at least a 12.5/13 hour shift over 3 days per week with 4 days off. You'll certainly get use to working those hours and the different shift patterns ( weekend, Nightshift and dayshift) but worth it at the end of your degree. You have to work a average 37.5 hours per week for both university studying block weeks and also when doing your placement either at hospital or the community.
Just to say community working is different from the hospital as you normally work between Monday and Friday with a day of in the week plus free weekends unlike hospital maternity units you'll be working long hours.

If you are 110% sure about jumping into being a midwife then don't hesitate in going for it as if you don't do it now you'll never do it..... Just remember when you apply for the midwife degree you'll be up against thousands upon thousands of other candidates for such limited amount of places available at each university in the UK because of the intensity of the training. In my country of the UK we only have 3 universities for midwife degree courses and they only take in around 250 potential students between them each year and this makes it very highly competitive. You may have to apply a few times but don't give up on becoming a midwife if this is your dream. I could suggest to you that you could apply for a job position as a MCA (maternity care assistant) as you'll be basically trained in every aspect of the midwife job roles working alongside the qualified midwives but you'll not be able to do any births as this is midwives place only if you don't get into university next year. Then you can always apply for university using your maternity care assistant role as your experience.


I always wanted to do adult nursing first and then eventually go down the 18/20 months shortened midwife top-up degree course but I eventually got offered a midwife place at university which saved me going back to university. I'm now just over 4 years qualified.


NHS registered midwife


This is amazing. Thank you for the detailed response. I want to apply with University of Bolton, and luckily they have a January and April intake. I went to the open day and they were pleased I’ve got many transferable skills as a teacher. I want to apply to the January intake. I’m hoping that it won’t be as competitive for January and April. If I don’t get January, I will surely apply again but I’m trying to remain confident that I will.

I applied to an MSW role, but I was told it would be better I apply to train as a midwife instead. I don’t know if this is because of the qualifications I already hold. No idea. I’ve wanted this since I was 18.

I’d also like to add, as I have a mental health condition and I take evening medication which does cause drowsiness, will I still be expected to do nights? I don’t want this to be a downer. I’m sure occupational health will look into it.
Reply 5
Any particular advice for personal statements and interviews?

Thank you
Reply 6
Original post by Smiley91
This is amazing. Thank you for the detailed response. I want to apply with University of Bolton, and luckily they have a January and April intake. I went to the open day and they were pleased I’ve got many transferable skills as a teacher. I want to apply to the January intake. I’m hoping that it won’t be as competitive for January and April. If I don’t get January, I will surely apply again but I’m trying to remain confident that I will.

I applied to an MSW role, but I was told it would be better I apply to train as a midwife instead. I don’t know if this is because of the qualifications I already hold. No idea. I’ve wanted this since I was 18.

I’d also like to add, as I have a mental health condition and I take evening medication which does cause drowsiness, will I still be expected to do nights? I don’t want this to be a downer. I’m sure occupational health will look into it.


You are welcome 🤗

Don't panic about getting into January as if you are successful then great for you but you have at least another opportunity for April and hopefully September.
A lot of your teaching skills will be useful for midwifery as I'm sure you have great communication skills and technology skills which will be definitely required.

I'm puzzled on why they said that MCA role wouldn't be just as good for you as you'll be trained in all aspects of midwifery except you can't do births........ I would definitely have done that if I wasn't getting a place on midwifery degree course and then when qualified start applying for midwifery degree again.

At the end of the day it's a option you have that you can do.


I can't really answer your question about you and taking medication because its going to be done to occupational health providers whether you are capable of doing Nightshift due to possible drowsiness from it.
A good thing about Nightshift is it's far quieter than dayshifts usually but you'll know that if a baby want to come out it will certainly come out no matter time of day or night it is.
You'll be expected to do Nightshift as part of the NMC requirements of the course as you have to do a certain amount of Nightshifts over the duration of the whole 3 years. Only thing that you can do is discuss the matter with occupational health and they will write probably be your GP for further information.
A lot of medications do say that it may cause " drowsiness" but not necessarily affecting the person as everyone is different with taking medication.

I had a student who takes medication that can cause drowsiness but she was perfectly fine when on Nightshift after taking but you are certainly correct that you don't want this to be a downer for you and cost you a place, there's only one way in finding out is that you do a Nightshift if successful and see how it goes as you don't know how you'll feel until you actually do a Nightshift.
Do you take this medication during the day and if so how do you feel.

I didn't do any Nightshifts in my first year but by the end of my second year I have to start doing them as back then I had to do a minimum of 72 hours (6 shifts basically) of Nightshifts to comply with NMC requirements and rest was dayshifts and weekend working. Our first years students do a Nightshift at the end of the first year to get them a taste of what to explain in second year onwards. .


Hopefully when you finally get into the course you'll have answers from occupational health on this matter.
Reply 7
Original post by Smiley91
Any particular advice for personal statements and interviews?

Thank you

Concentrate your personal statement on why you want to be a midwife. Remember that you only have a certain amount of words that you have to write about it.

Interviews are unpredictable as you don't know what you'll be asked about but some examples:-

1) why do you want to be a midwife
2) why have you chosen this particular university to study midwifery at
3) understand the NMC code of practice
4) the 6 C's of nursing
5) read your personal statement over just incase you get asked anything about what you wrote in it
6) how would you cope with stress while you are on shift
7) how will you cope with a bereavement while you are on shift and still be professional as a midwife as this is part of your job.

Hopefully this helps you
Hey, studying for any healthcare degree can be tough with placement hours. However, if you are passionate about the course and you know this is the path for you I would 100% go for it! :thumbsup:

There is also government support available for healthcare degrees which may impact your decision.

- There is travel and accommodation support for healthcare students and they can claim money back from travelling to placement etc.
- More students from low-income families will be given financial help.
- Non-repayable training grant for eligible nursing, midwifery, and allied health professional students of £5,000 per academic year.

To see what you are eligible check out this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/healthcare-studies-more-affordable-as-financial-support-increased

I hope this helps you decision, good luck :hello:
Reply 9
Original post by Tracey_W
Concentrate your personal statement on why you want to be a midwife. Remember that you only have a certain amount of words that you have to write about it.

Interviews are unpredictable as you don't know what you'll be asked about but some examples:-

1) why do you want to be a midwife
2) why have you chosen this particular university to study midwifery at
3) understand the NMC code of practice
4) the 6 C's of nursing
5) read your personal statement over just incase you get asked anything about what you wrote in it
6) how would you cope with stress while you are on shift
7) how will you cope with a bereavement while you are on shift and still be professional as a midwife as this is part of your job.

Hopefully this helps you

Hi, thank you so much for this information.

I’ve been away and didn’t get the chance to reply.

I went ahead and sent my application either for January or April, but the sooner the better.

Luckily there’s some spaces for January as I was told some people didn’t meet the requirements. Makes me a little nervous but hoping the experiences I have will by enough.

Thank you once again for all the support
Reply 10
Original post by Smiley91
Hi, thank you so much for this information.

I’ve been away and didn’t get the chance to reply.

I went ahead and sent my application either for January or April, but the sooner the better.

Luckily there’s some spaces for January as I was told some people didn’t meet the requirements. Makes me a little nervous but hoping the experiences I have will by enough.

Thank you once again for all the support

Hi
No worries about trying to assist you with some kind of information. Don't worry about late reply as you had other things to do and hope you enjoyed time away.

That's good news that you applied for both intakes for January and April and hopefully you'll get a opportunity sooner rather than later.

The requirements are generally very high as they set what is required for entry into midwifery at universal because it's a very hard course that you'll be doing over the next three years.
Don't get all nervous as keep calm and when you get a opportunity for a interview remember you need to keep hold of yourself but you are allowed to have a bit of nervous about yourself.

You have good communication skills
Hopefully you'll have good technology skills

Those are two of the most expensive ones I would say that you need more as you are taking to patients all day and guiding them through the process of what you are doing. Technology skills as you need to input patients information.

Just be prepared for what lies ahead for you.

I'm here if need more information okay and you are always welcome to PM me anytime. I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Keep me posted how you doing.
Reply 11
Original post by Tracey_W
Hi
No worries about trying to assist you with some kind of information. Don't worry about late reply as you had other things to do and hope you enjoyed time away.

That's good news that you applied for both intakes for January and April and hopefully you'll get a opportunity sooner rather than later.

The requirements are generally very high as they set what is required for entry into midwifery at universal because it's a very hard course that you'll be doing over the next three years.
Don't get all nervous as keep calm and when you get a opportunity for a interview remember you need to keep hold of yourself but you are allowed to have a bit of nervous about yourself.

You have good communication skills
Hopefully you'll have good technology skills

Those are two of the most expensive ones I would say that you need more as you are taking to patients all day and guiding them through the process of what you are doing. Technology skills as you need to input patients information.

Just be prepared for what lies ahead for you.

I'm here if need more information okay and you are always welcome to PM me anytime. I'll get back to you as soon as possible.

Keep me posted how you doing.


Thank you - I was told they're sorting out interview dates and should hear back in around two weeks.

I appreciate the support. With technology, I know how to use this well especially with lesson planning and I also do online tutoring, Zoom, etc.

It's been a long time coming. I hope this is my opportunity. I will definitely keep you posted - most likely through a PM.

Have a good weekend!
(edited 5 months ago)
Original post by Smiley91
Any particular advice for personal statements and interviews?

Thank you


Personal statement advice for healthcare courses:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/hive-articles/nursing-and-allied-health-personal-statement-guidance

And the following is taken from this thread:

For a vocational subject (e.g. medicine, teaching, nursing etc.):

Introduction - You should briefly outline why you want to become whatever it is you are applying for (so a doctor/dentist/nurse etc.). You don't need to demonstrate skills or list experiences at this stage.
Section 1 - This should discuss your shadowing experience, to show that you have a realistic view of what you are applying for. The best way to do this is to discuss what you learned from your shadowing about the role - such as the skills and qualities that are required.
Section 2 - This section should discuss your work experience/volunteering, to show that you have a good potential to do the job, by showing that you have the correct skills and qualities.
Section 3 - You can briefly (if you have space) talk about academic interests, such as a talk/research article you have read in a related area that you found interesting. This section should take a low priority, however.
Section 4 - Include hobbies and extra-curricular activities in a paragraph that you haven't mentioned previously. For example, you may talk about hobbies you use to unwind.
Conclusion - The conclusion should be brief (1-2 sentences) but should summarise and reiterate your interest in the role and your aptitude and skill for it. You could (if relevant) add longer-term aspirations (e.g. what specialism you would like to go into), but it is not necessary.
Reply 13
Original post by Smiley91
Thank you - I was told they're sorting out interview dates and should hear back in around two weeks.

I appreciate the support. With technology, I know how to use this well especially with lesson planning and I also do online tutoring, Zoom, etc.

It's been a long time coming. I hope this is my opportunity. I will definitely keep you posted - most likely through a PM.

Have a good weekend!


Hopefully you'll know soon about a interview date as they will have to get them down and sorted out for those who are hopefully successful for January intake so you can get things sorted out.

So you have got great technology skills which is fantastic and you have the necessary skills for communicating with people.

Hopefully you'll have made the right choices when you finally have start at university again as a student midwife.
Looking forward in your update etc okay.

You too have a good weekend.
Reply 14
I hope it’s sooner rather than later - I hate the waiting!

Yes I have transferable skills which I hope will work in my favour.

Thank you again - will let you know as soon as I do!
Reply 15
Original post by Smiley91
I hope it’s sooner rather than later - I hate the waiting!

Yes I have transferable skills which I hope will work in my favour.

Thank you again - will let you know as soon as I do!


Hope for you that you'll get started with the midwifery degree but obviously the waiting is the problem as you don't know what is happening until you get notified.

Yeah your skills is definitely transferable so you shouldn't have any issues with these.

You are welcome and I'm looking forward to hearing good news soon.
Reply 16
I contacted the uni today just to find out how long it will take as January is around the corner!

They couldn’t find my application first and it gave me a panic. I called back a little later and the lady said the uni is currently updating something with ucas and as soon as that’s complete they’ll pull the applications from ucas and start the process. She said it could be 1-2 weeks but they’re aware of the time. I hope it’s sooner rather than later!
Reply 17
Original post by Smiley91
I contacted the uni today just to find out how long it will take as January is around the corner!

They couldn’t find my application first and it gave me a panic. I called back a little later and the lady said the uni is currently updating something with ucas and as soon as that’s complete they’ll pull the applications from ucas and start the process. She said it could be 1-2 weeks but they’re aware of the time. I hope it’s sooner rather than later!


Yes January not far away now and they do leave it late for people to arrange things 😕😕. how do they expect people to arrange accommodation and student finance etc in short time.

I would just relax for the next few weeks and hopefully you'll get a notification from them saying that you have been successful with your application and would like to offer you a interview.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending