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Do subject combinations or grades matter more?

For Russell group unis (specifically KCL and UCL) do they look at your subject combination or grades more? I want to study psychology and both unis want you to have one science or maths subject. If I meet this requirement and get predicted A*A*A, will I be at an advantage compared to someone who’s doing 3 sciences and is predicted AAA?
Reply 1
In most cases grades would matter slightly more I think. As long as you're taking the subjects they require, having the highest grades in less relevant subjects might be more appealing than okay grades in more relevant subjects. Exceptions might be if you're getting top grades in subjects that are sometimes disregarded (eg. general studies, critical thinking, etc)
Reply 2
I got into kcl for psych with a*aa in geog psych and sociology
Original post by Ididjsjdjudue
For Russell group unis (specifically KCL and UCL) do they look at your subject combination or grades more? I want to study psychology and both unis want you to have one science or maths subject. If I meet this requirement and get predicted A*A*A, will I be at an advantage compared to someone who’s doing 3 sciences and is predicted AAA?

So long as you've got an acceptable combination, then grades matter more.
Original post by fnaejofaof
I got into kcl for psych with a*aa in geog psych and sociology

What did you get for your GCSEs?
Reply 5
Original post by Ididjsjdjudue
What did you get for your GCSEs?

like 7s & 8s
Original post by Ididjsjdjudue
For Russell group unis (specifically KCL and UCL) do they look at your subject combination or grades more? I want to study psychology and both unis want you to have one science or maths subject. If I meet this requirement and get predicted A*A*A, will I be at an advantage compared to someone who’s doing 3 sciences and is predicted AAA?

Depends a lot on the uni, course, and subjects vs grades in question.

Generally you need to meet the stated subject and grade requirements. However beyond that subject combinations may make a difference, as may higher predicted or actual grades.

In terms of UCL psychology - it's known to be VERY scientific as a course and I understand most students on the course have two or three STEM subjects. There does seem to be a preference for that. I gather KCL is also very scientific oriented so may be similar.
Reply 7
Original post by artful_lounger
Depends a lot on the uni, course, and subjects vs grades in question.

Generally you need to meet the stated subject and grade requirements. However beyond that subject combinations may make a difference, as may higher predicted or actual grades.

In terms of UCL psychology - it's known to be VERY scientific as a course and I understand most students on the course have two or three STEM subjects. There does seem to be a preference for that. I gather KCL is also very scientific oriented so may be similar.

i find KCL to be pretty scientific based too, more options for neuroscience and biology than sociological psych
Reply 8
Original post by username6699471
For Russell group unis (specifically KCL and UCL) do they look at your subject combination or grades more? I want to study psychology and both unis want you to have one science or maths subject. If I meet this requirement and get predicted A*A*A, will I be at an advantage compared to someone who’s doing 3 sciences and is predicted AAA?

what is russell group unis ? and what's the difference from other unis
i am in year 9 and don't know what it is ..
all I know is oxbridge lol
Reply 9
Original post by Alm_xo
what is russell group unis ? and what's the difference from other unis
i am in year 9 and don't know what it is ..
all I know is oxbridge lol

They are a made-up group of universities that are research focused. The group is irrelevant for most degrees but they hype themselves up. The teaching is often no better than the others - in fact it can be worse.

You should ignore the RG 'thing' and look at the courses and whether a year in industry is a better prep for a job.
Original post by Muttley79
They are a made-up group of universities that are research focused. The group is irrelevant for most degrees but they hype themselves up. The teaching is often no better than the others - in fact it can be worse.

You should ignore the RG 'thing' and look at the courses and whether a year in industry is a better prep for a job.

I agree but also many employers look for those unis and sometimes regard them as higher. I also think that because they’re research unis theres often many more opportunities, like kcl offers student to help assist in their research trials and are able to offer good work experience. It also helps with learning the most up to date research. But non RG unis are also very good
Original post by fnaejofaof
I agree but also many employers look for those unis and sometimes regard them as higher. I also think that because they’re research unis theres often many more opportunities, like kcl offers student to help assist in their research trials and are able to offer good work experience. It also helps with learning the most up to date research. But non RG unis are also very good

No that's just not true - lecturers don't want undergrads messing with their research! Teaching is often done reluctantly especially freshers!

It's also not true that employers look for RG - except perhaps Law and IB. For most jobs these days they want experience. Most employers can't tell Bath from Liverpool as to which is RG.
Original post by Muttley79
No that's just not true - lecturers don't want undergrads messing with their research! Teaching is often done reluctantly especially freshers!

It's also not true that employers look for RG - except perhaps Law and IB. For most jobs these days they want experience. Most employers can't tell Bath from Liverpool as to which is RG.

I mean I have helped in the labs with research, and many placements are done in research labs at kings but of course it’s different between unis - i’m just saying from my experience at a RG. Undergrads also don’t mess up the research, they are taught and given a lot of experience and watched over to ensure this doesn’t happen - which is one of the main reasons they have this opportunity, to prepare them from future jobs and give them to relevant experience for employers.
It’s also no secret that many employers act more favourably toward RG unis, of course whilst considering their experience.
Original post by fnaejofaof
I mean I have helped in the labs with research, and many placements are done in research labs at kings but of course it’s different between unis - i’m just saying from my experience at a RG. Undergrads also don’t mess up the research, they are taught and given a lot of experience and watched over to ensure this doesn’t happen - which is one of the main reasons they have this opportunity, to prepare them from future jobs and give them to relevant experience for employers.
It’s also no secret that many employers act more favourably toward RG unis, of course whilst considering their experience.

They don't - I can name many ex-students that have gone to non-RG and done a year in industry and secured jobs ahead of RG students because they have that work experience. Do you think non-RG do no research at all? Of course not -

In Engineering the most successful Formula Student teams are Oxford Brookes and Bath ...
Original post by Muttley79
They don't - I can name many ex-students that have gone to non-RG and done a year in industry and secured jobs ahead of RG students because they have that work experience. Do you think non-RG do no research at all? Of course not -

In Engineering the most successful Formula Student teams are Oxford Brookes and Bath ...

That’s wasn’t what I was arguing. I was saying RG unis often offer those research and experiences within their own uni do to their bigger facilities and funding - which I personally view as a big advantage. But RG unis are generally rated higher in the times ratings and stuff like that, which employers do often refer to. Like goldman sachs new recruits are 70% from RG, and rgs often have strong employability rates. Ofc experience is important and favourable but when there’s 2 candidates with same experience one non-rg and one rg, employers tend to favour the rg student.
Original post by fnaejofaof
That’s wasn’t what I was arguing. I was saying RG unis often offer those research and experiences within their own uni do to their bigger facilities and funding - which I personally view as a big advantage. But RG unis are generally rated higher in the times ratings and stuff like that, which employers do often refer to. Like goldman sachs new recruits are 70% from RG, and rgs often have strong employability rates. Ofc experience is important and favourable but when there’s 2 candidates with same experience one non-rg and one rg, employers tend to favour the rg student.

Sorry you are wrong - many of my students get jobs ahead of Oxbridge students because they have real-world experience.

Presumably you know that many employers recruit institute blind and just look at the degree classification? Do not be fooled by the RG hype.

RG unis do not have the best facilities - Brookes Engineering facilities are far better - that's why they win Formula Student so often . They had 3D printing over 10 years ago.
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by Muttley79
Sorry you are wrong - many of my students get jobs ahead of Oxbridge students because they have real-world experience.

Presumably you know that many employers recruit institute blind and just look at the degree classification? Do not be fooled by the RG hype.

RG unis do not have the best facilities - Brookes Engineering facilities are far better - that's why they win Formula Student so often . They had 3D printing over 10 years ago.

Of course it’s subject dependent, I’m sure oxford brookes engineering facilities are great but in comparison to kcl or other rg unis i looked at their psych facilities didn’t compare. Talking to other psychologists around the world they are all aware of kcl psych facilities and regard it highly.

I don’t think i am fooled by rg hype, more my own comparison between rg and non-rg unis I looked at, and it’s my personal opinion that for MY SUBJECT psychology at kcl (which this thread is about btw) i think there is an advantage. And the links and reputation their psychology facility holds gives many opportunities - for example a researcher my friend was undertaking experience through was able to also get them experience at auckland uni.

Maybe consider the context and be more open to interpreting their opinions like i did yours :smile:

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