The Student Room Group

Advice on Picking a London University

I've been accepted into the following universities for English and Film. I'm English but have lived abroad my whole life, so I'd love somewhere quite diverse and with people from different backgrounds. Also I'd obviously like somewhere with good facilities, lecturers, student support, etc. I'm having difficulty choosing and will not be able to visit any of the campuses irl before the decision deadline. If you are a student at any of these places, please give me insight on what it's like to go to school there! Or if anyone knows any useful websites for info (Like Uni compare). Thanks!
1. City University of London
2. Royal Holloway
3. Queen Mary University
4. Northeastern University London
Original post by a.oak
I've been accepted into the following universities for English and Film. I'm English but have lived abroad my whole life, so I'd love somewhere quite diverse and with people from different backgrounds. Also I'd obviously like somewhere with good facilities, lecturers, student support, etc. I'm having difficulty choosing and will not be able to visit any of the campuses irl before the decision deadline. If you are a student at any of these places, please give me insight on what it's like to go to school there! Or if anyone knows any useful websites for info (Like Uni compare). Thanks!
1. City University of London
2. Royal Holloway
3. Queen Mary University
4. Northeastern University London

I hadn't heard of number 4 until your post. Do any experienced users such as @McGinger @Admit-One or @PQ know anything about it?
Original post by ageshallnot
I hadn't heard of number 4 until your post. Do any experienced users such as @McGinger @Admit-One or @PQ know anything about it?


Used to be called New College of the Humanities. Ironically offered few humanities courses and mostly business/econ/related type things as I recall.

As far as I could tell it was a failed attempt to create a new university from the ground up and so had to get acquired by Northeastern University from the US.

I'm skeptical of the how much value added one would get from a degree there vs the other options, personally.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by artful_lounger
Used to be called New College of the Humanities. Ironically offered few humanities courses and mostly business/econ/related type things as I recall.
As far as I could tell it was a failed attempt to create a new university from the ground up and so had to get acquired by Northeastern University from the US.
I'm skeptical of the how much value added one would get from a degree there vs the other options, personally.

Oh, that place!
Original post by ageshallnot
Oh, that place!

I had the exact same process first time I heard of the rebranded name :laugh:
Reply 5
Original post by artful_lounger
Used to be called New College of the Humanities. Ironically offered few humanities courses and mostly business/econ/related type things as I recall.
As far as I could tell it was a failed attempt to create a new university from the ground up and so had to get acquired by Northeastern University from the US.
I'm skeptical of the how much value added one would get from a degree there vs the other options, personally.

I get your skepticism tbh... For me the main selling points are the central London Campus (which seem to have good facilities?) and the possibility to do a semester/year at Northeastern Boston.
Reply 6
No facilities. Its tiny.
And it isnt a great 'student experience'.

And you'll spend the rest of your life explaining why you have a weird degree from a Uni no-one has heard of.
Original post by a.oak
I get your skepticism tbh... For me the main selling points are the central London Campus (which seem to have good facilities?) and the possibility to do a semester/year at Northeastern Boston.

There are plenty of central London universities otherwise which are arguably better (UCL) or similar (SOAS), which may well have some relevant year abroad options in the US. I think going somewhere on the possibility of going to Northeastern for a term or a year, is a bit of a gamble. Not sure what facilities you are referring to, but it doesn't even appear to have its own library which seems a bit worrying...
Northeastern is the London annexe of a mid ranking US university. It is the reincarnation of the philosopher Anthony Grayling's either noble or daft attempt to found an Oxford college in London. It failed to attract funding, or Oxford calibre students, ran out of money, and was bought by Northeastern. It occupies a floor and a half of a modern office building near Tower Bridge and does not even have its own coffee shop.

If being amidst the cool and gritty swirl of London matters, City and QM are the ones. Or try UAL. Royal Holloway is in Egham, a commuter town outside London.
Royal Holloway isn't really a "London uni" it's right on the edge, in a small town called Egham. You'd need a 30min train to go to proper London. However it's a gorgeous campus, I've been there a couple times now and everyone was lovely! It seems quite diverse too with lots of multi-cultural and different faith societies. Id recommend it :smile:

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