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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    What is wrong with paying for it yourself ill likely be paying for a significant proportion of my medical degree myself, why should you pay for your degree.
    There is nothing wrong with paying for it myself.

    What I'm saying though is that with the current system the government expect parents to! Hence why someone from a low income gets a full grant etc because the government don't think their parents can afford to help their kids. Yet I get less because they expect my parent to pay for me. So someone from a low income can't get a job whilst they are studying??
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    (Original post by umbrellasky)
    There is nothing wrong with paying for it myself.

    What I'm saying though is that with the current system the government expect parents to! Hence why someone from a low income gets a full grant etc because the government don't think their parents can afford to help their kids. Yet I get less because they expect my parent to pay for me. So someone from a low income can't get a job whilst they are studying??
    Actually I think it's probably more to do with the fact that without any form of instrumental social justice, those from low income background go on to maintain a similar level of income in their lifetimes, and pass this on to the next generation. People who come from low income backgrounds are their through no fault of their own, it is entirely unfortunate. Hence the government gives out grants.

    Ideally, you shouldn't have to pay either. University should be part of the social justice package. Unfortunately, the tax payers don't see it this way, hence the governments unwillingness to redistribute in this manner. The fault with the system arises from citizen's unwillingness to contribute to higher education, and that in itself is hotly contested.

    Whether or not you get help from your parents isn't really going to affect your life prospects. Numerous studies over the years have shown that your economic and social background are highly determinant of what you're going to realize as an adult. These are arbitrary. Hence we need to rectify the problem for those that it affects most severely (i.e. those that are part of the low income 'poverty' cycle), even if it means that your parents are going to be stringent and make you have a job - that's a choice your parents have made, have fun and if you want to complain then campaign to increase (or redistribute) taxes and support higher education for all.

    Enjoy your job
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    I think the best way to do it would be for everyone to be offered the same amount, but in different combinations of grant and loan. Those on the poorest incomes would be 50/50, up to 100% loan for those on the highest incomes

    This would be fair because on average the amount people pay back themselves will be about equal
    Those from the poorest families will pay the half that they got in the loan
    Those from the richest families, some will have it all paid by the parents, some some and some none, probably averaging out at about half overall

    One of the other things that bugs me is when people say 'Its so unfair that I have to live in the cheapest accommodation and have to work when other people dont' and then dont take into account that for the past 18 years of their lives they have been treated to luxuries such as multiple foreign holidays, cars, games consoles, nice houses, so many more opportunities whereas the 'lucky' people who get the full loan haven't
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    (Original post by caroline147)
    I don't see why grants couldn't be removed entirely and then the amount of student loan available raised. Then everyone would be in the same situation: borrowing money as an adult as an investment which they will return later. Students from low-income households would still be able to go to uni if the student loan were raised to amount that people could actually subsist off.
    :dontknow:
    :ditto:

    OP, the only thing I'd say is that there are some students whose parents have paid tens of thousands of pounds for a private education and these students go on to get hugely subsidised univeristy fees and subsidised loans. I'd say there's a limit to everyone being treated the same.
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    (Original post by ~Viola~)
    Ok, in the middle of a huge debate with my friend so any points I can argue would b appreciated!

    I'm on the minimum loan, no grant and have minimal support from my parents. My accommodation fees are £700 greater than my loan. How is it fair that I have to get work to afford uni when students from lower income families get a lot more and grants.

    Why should I have to take the cheapest room next year, loan still not covering it when my friend can afford the best room with £2000 left over to live off when I will struggle to afford food, electricity etc. I literally had to take the cheapest room I could find.

    My arguement is that everyone who moves away to uni should be given the same amount because we are living in the same circumstances and being over 18 why should parental income and not outcome matter?

    Im trying not to be arrogant but would like people's thoughts, especially those with simular reasons as me and arguements that I can use in my debate!
    Hmm the only thing i can say is that a student from a poorer household is more likely to go to a university which won't enable a decent career with a high salary at the end of it. Therefore they are going to be in debt for a longer period of time than the more well of student who will get into a top university and will pay of the loan quicker.
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    Two words: Grad Tax.

    Solves all this.
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    Why are your parents not helping you?
    Basically they can't afford much! The system takes into account all money coming into the house, it doesn't consider outgoings, other siblings etc.

    They are helping, as much they can but it's not really significant.
 
 
 

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