Turn on thread page Beta

Why has criticizing Islam become such a taboo? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Did you notice a big difference in politicians reaction to those who criticize islam compared to those who criticize Christianity or other religions?

    Thoughts?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    Everyone should have a right to criticise anything, especially if it presents a set of ideas. I think it's become taboo because those who are left wing and are too afraid to 'offend'. They fend off criticism by calling it 'hate speech' but pointing out flaws is not inherently 'hateful' and certainly does not incite violence. If we didn't criticise Christianity we would still be following the old testament, which advocated for infanticide.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Not another one... smh
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by letterbomb4678)
    Everyone should have a right to criticise anything, especially if it presents a set of ideas. I think it's become taboo because those who are left wing and are too afraid to 'offend'. They fend off criticism by calling it 'hate speech' but pointing out flaws is not inherently 'hateful' and certainly does not incite violence. If we didn't criticise Christianity we would still be following the old testament, which advocated for infanticide.
    Fantastic detailed response, cheers and thanks for your contribution

    (Original post by Fazzy_77)
    Not another one... smh
    yes another one, why not?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by donzie)
    Did you notice a big difference in politicians reaction to those who criticize islam compared to those who criticize Christianity or other religions?

    Thoughts?
    i guess it depends which aspect of any religion you criticize. if somebody believes that a religion says something that it actually doesn't or is a misconception then it's a bit dodge. and as long as you don't use your freedom of speech to inhibit another person's freedom of speech i don't see the issue.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by amzyrads)
    i guess it depends which aspect of any religion you criticize. if somebody believes that a religion says something that it actually doesn't or is a misconception then it's a bit dodge. and as long as you don't use your freedom of speech to inhibit another person's freedom of speech i don't see the issue.
    Thing is they are muffling voices of those who are knowledgeable of it and support their claims by facts and verses
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Criticising Islam is fine; making generalisations about Muslims is not. That doesn't mean you can't do it or that your freedom of speech is being abridged - just that people might voice their own criticism of your opinions if you do.

    I think some people make damaging generalisations about Muslims and then hide from disapproval using the idea that they are criticising Islam. To be fair, though, there probably are also false positives - people who make valid criticisms of Islam and are ostracised for what others wrongly perceive as discrimination.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by donzie)
    Did you notice a big difference in politicians reaction to those who criticize islam compared to those who criticize Christianity or other religions?

    Thoughts?
    Free speech should include the right to say things that others will take offence to, whether the intention is to give offence or not. When ideas are silenced in public discourse, they can go underground and become more extreme, without the challenge to tether it to moderation. Hence echo-chambers... This is of course in reference to any idea from anywhere on the political or religio-political spectrum.

    When it comes to Islam, there are may little facets that contribute. Right-wing Muslims use 'Islamophobia' as a shut-down against any criticism of the religion, its texts or followers. Some politicians and commentators are rightly concerned for their safety in openly criticising Islam, as right-wing Muslims have murdered people for doing so (see the examples of Theo Van Gogh, or Charlie Hebdo), or made very real threats to individual lives, democracy and free speech (see Ayaan Hirsi Ali, or Turkey demanding EU sanctions on Denmark - without even being a member state).

    Left-wing politicians and commentators are reluctant to criticise Islam through a perspective that all beliefs should be respected equally, but also because there is a right-wing white minority in the UK who would take honest criticism of the texts as an open door they can kick-in, using it to legitimise their racist hate of central-Asian people as a whole. I've experience just this kind of person, so it is not a snowflake fallacy.
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Criticising Islam is fine; making generalisations about Muslims is not. That doesn't mean you can't do it or that your freedom of speech is being abridged - just that people might voice their own criticism of your opinions if you do.

    I think some people make damaging generalisations about Muslims and then hide from disapproval using the idea that they are criticising Islam. To be fair, though, there probably are also false positives - people who make valid criticisms of Islam and are ostracised for what others wrongly perceive as discrimination.
    Half of what you said is correct, but the other half is where you're a bit wrong.

    People who criticize Islam tend to be hated on for being "racist" by Muslims because some Muslims feel that criticizing Islam is the same as criticizing them. But in order to get a point across sometimes, it's nearly impossible because people are too scared to be seen as racist.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Criticising Islam is fine; making generalisations about Muslims is not. That doesn't mean you can't do it or that your freedom of speech is being abridged - just that people might voice their own criticism of your opinions if you do.

    I think some people make damaging generalisations about Muslims and then hide from disapproval using the idea that they are criticising Islam. To be fair, though, there probably are also false positives - people who make valid criticisms of Islam and are ostracised for what others wrongly perceive as discrimination.
    i totally agree with that. i know it sounds cheesy and stupid but genuinely islam that has been taught to me does not advocate violence, and does not justify the actions of the daesh nutters. i question and critisize my own religion a lot and i find that when i ask people about my doubts they're happy to answer my questions. the things that people say about islam are usually misconceptions which easy to do, i can bet i do it about other religions a lot. i believe that its not radical islam, it's islam radicalised.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Criticising Islam is fine; making generalisations about Muslims is not. That doesn't mean you can't do it or that your freedom of speech is being abridged - just that people might voice their own criticism of your opinions if you do.

    I think some people make damaging generalisations about Muslims and then hide from disapproval using the idea that they are criticising Islam. To be fair, though, there probably are also false positives - people who make valid criticisms of Islam and are ostracised for what others wrongly perceive as discrimination.
    I completely agree, making generalisations proves nothing. I just don't think that you should be socially outcasted for disagreeing. Of course those with actual prejudice and hate for islam will again use this to their advantage to possibly spread violence against muslims.

    It's still completely wrong to dictate what someone is 'allowed' to say.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    Criticising Islam is fine; making generalisations about Muslims is not. That doesn't mean you can't do it or that your freedom of speech is being abridged - just that people might voice their own criticism of your opinions if you do.

    I think some people make damaging generalisations about Muslims and then hide from disapproval using the idea that they are criticising Islam. To be fair, though, there probably are also false positives - people who make valid criticisms of Islam and are ostracised for what others wrongly perceive as discrimination.
    indeed ignorant people do generalizations about muslims, but most of the critics are well versed in Islam as an ideology, when an ideology isn't compatible with western values, it raises a little small flag over the head of those who supposedly follow it, it's like : Cannibalism is bad, I claim to be a cannibal but i don't eat humans, people will be like...dude what are you exactly? lil flag on your head much?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by letterbomb4678)
    I completely agree, making generalisations proves nothing. I just don't think that you should be socially outcasted for disagreeing. Of course those with actual prejudice and hate for islam will again use this to their advantage to possibly spread violence against islam.

    It's still completely wrong to dictate what someone is 'allowed' to say.
    It's not possible to spread violence against islam, it's an idea, i think you meant against muslims
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    We get this thread every other day
    Online

    16
    ReputationRep:
    It shouldn't be taboo. However, there are people like .. Okay, I won't mention them. But there are people who make it their lives work to spread 'hate' under the disguise of critisizing Islam. That's why it has become taboo. Shame really.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by letterbomb4678)
    I completely agree, making generalisations proves nothing. I just don't think that you should be socially outcasted for disagreeing. Of course those with actual prejudice and hate for islam will again use this to their advantage to possibly spread violence against islam.

    It's still completely wrong to dictate what someone is 'allowed' to say.
    I specifically made clear that I have not and do not attempt to dictate what anyone is ''allowed'' to say.

    If you say something and are socially ostracised for it, what has happened is that a bunch of different people have voiced their disapproval of your opinion. Would you take away their right to criticise your opinion?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by donzie)
    It's not possible to spread violence against islam, it's an idea, i think you meant against muslims
    Sorry my mistake, you're right.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by donzie)
    indeed ignorant people do generalizations about muslims, but most of the critics are well versed in Islam as an ideology, when an ideology isn't compatible with western values, it raises a little small flag over the head of those who supposedly follow it, it's like : Cannibalism is bad, I claim to be a cannibal but i don't eat humans, people will be like...dude what are you exactly? lil flag on your head much?
    This is how ideologies are reformed and redeemed, and how religions evolve - their followers decide to ignore portions of their creed that they realise could hurt people or that aren't compatible with modern life. If you want Islam to become more compatible with Western values, criticising Muslims for picking and choosing doesn't seem terribly productive.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anosmianAcrimony)
    I specifically made clear that I have not and do not attempt to dictate what anyone is ''allowed'' to say.

    If you say something and are socially ostracised for it, what has happened is that a bunch of different people have voiced their disapproval of your opinion. Would you take away their right to criticise your opinion?
    No of course not, but what is happening is not the criticism of an opinion but instead a deliberate silencing of that view, similar to what you see in socialist countries. It's not even a criticism of that opinion it's an intolerance to that opinion.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by letterbomb4678)
    No of course not, but what is happening is not the criticism of an opinion but instead a deliberate silencing of that view, similar to what you see in socialist countries. It's not even a criticism of that opinion it's an intolerance to that opinion.
    Sounds bad. How have you been silenced, or had that intolerance practiced on you?
 
 
 

2,679

students online now

800,000+

Exam discussions

Find your exam discussion here

Poll
Should predicted grades be removed from the uni application process
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.