Should Cannabis be legalised?

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richard10012
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#1
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#1
Given that Cannabis is legal in parts of the US, should the U.K. government follow suit?
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Captain Haddock
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#2
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#2
Yes.
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londonmyst
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#3
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#3
No.
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StriderHort
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#4
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#4
It should be decriminalised at any rate, only legalised with restrictions as it IS a drug. But we shouldn't do things just because the US does as they make a lot of bad choices.

Tbh the UK is already quietly halfway towards this with many police forced long ignoring small incidents
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Burridge
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#5
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#5
I believe so yes. Opening up a legal market for cannabis will mitigate much of the harm associated with the drug. Used recreationally there is little harm for the user & indeed profound benefits have been associated with it. There are risks - a risk of psychosis especially for those that use regularly at a young age (>25) - but nothing that regulation and targeted educational campaigns won't be able to help alleviate.

Many of the societal harms we associate with cannabis is tied to the criminal gangs that manage and distribute it: crops are sprayed with harsh chemicals, dangerously high THC levels, drug-dealing, gateway activity, money-laundering, financing other gang related activities etc. Legalising and regulating the market will be a much more sensible approach.

That's not to say we should encourage use - there is a big difference. But there is such an unnecessary stigma associate with cannabis - this is one of the reasons why we are only just beginning to investigate its medical benefits.
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JOSH4598
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#6
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#6
Part of me would say yes, purely to take a load of work off the police who spend a huge amount of time chasing users about and seizing small quantities.

But given cannabis is often referred to as a gateway drug, legalising it will inevitably encourage people to give it a go. I feel the consequence will be a big uptake in more harmful drugs which will wipe out any saving in police time.
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DSilva
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#7
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#7
(Original post by JOSH4598)
Part of me would say yes, purely to take a load of work off the police who spend a huge amount of time chasing users about and seizing small quantities.

But given cannabis is often referred to as a gateway drug, legalising it will inevitably encourage people to give it a go. I feel the consequence will be a big uptake in more harmful drugs which will wipe out any saving in police time.
Do you have any evidence at all for the claim in your second paragraph?
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Rakas21
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#8
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#8
While I would like to see possession made a fixed penalty notice offense (and allow the police to keep the revenue to give them an incentive to go after anybody with it), I see no great advantage to society in making it legal.

If it were though we should adopt high import tarrifs to encourage a domestic industry (we usually oppose these to keep costs down but I have no sympathy for drug users so I have no problem in inflating prices).
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Captain Haddock
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#9
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#9
(Original post by Rakas21)
If it were though we should adopt high import tarrifs to encourage a domestic industry (we usually oppose these to keep costs down but I have no sympathy for drug users so I have no problem in inflating prices).
That's fine. The UK is already the word's largest producer and exporter of medical cannabis. We are fully tooled up to reap the benefits of a huge domestic industry but for some reason we'd rather those £billions go to criminal enterprises.
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Rakas21
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#10
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#10
(Original post by Captain Haddock)
That's fine. The UK is already the word's largest producer and exporter of medical cannabis. We are fully tooled up to reap the benefits of a huge domestic industry but for some reason we'd rather those £billions go to criminal enterprises.
Im rather opposed because recreational use (as opposed to use in products) has minimal health benefits and we live in a nation where government has allowed mass obesity and disability ect.. I'm also wary of the gateway argument.

Obviously as a capitalist there's part of me which looks enticingly at the idiots that would purchase such a product and the potential profit opportunities.
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Fenneko
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#11
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#11
Never.
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SHallowvale
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#12
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#12
Yes. Criminalisation has failed and trying to enforce it has been a complete waste of time and money. I don't think the harms associated with cannabis are enough to justify it being banned outright.
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JOSH4598
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#13
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#13
(Original post by DSilva)
Do you have any evidence at all for the claim in your second paragraph?
I didn't (as I would have thought it's common sense that making something legal would result in more people using it, than when it was illegal). However a quick search reveals Amsterdam are trying to ban tourists from consuming cannabis there due to a "worrying interdependence between the soft and hard drug trade". I would have thought Amsterdam is a good example for us here in the UK, compared to the US which is remarkably different in terms of policing. People seem to skim over the possibility that hard drugs could become more widely-used, not knowing how devastating drugs can be.
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Captain Haddock
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#14
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#14
(Original post by JOSH4598)
I didn't (as I would have thought it's common sense that making something legal would result in more people using it, than when it was illegal). However a quick search reveals Amsterdam are trying to ban tourists from consuming cannabis there due to a "worrying interdependence between the soft and hard drug trade". I would have thought Amsterdam is a good example for us here in the UK, compared to the US which is remarkably different in terms of policing. People seem to skim over the possibility that hard drugs could become more widely-used, not knowing how devastating drugs can be.
Amsterdam is not a good case study for legalisation. For one thing, it's not legal - just heavily decriminalised. NL have a pretty ridiculous system whereby criminal gangs remain in control of the entire supply line and there's basically nothing the government can do about it because they have grown so poweful. I believe the long term goal of this new policy is to starve the gangs of income from tourism so the government can take control of the industry and enact sensible reforms. Nobody should be seeking to replicate what they have over there. America and Canada provide much better examples because the industry is actually regulated, which is what most proponents for legalisation argue for.
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Crazed cat lady
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#15
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#15
As someone who generally believes individuals are far better placed to make decisions about their own lives rather than relying on the government to carry them through life, yes.
Last edited by Crazed cat lady; 1 day ago
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JOSH4598
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#16
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#16
(Original post by Captain Haddock)
Amsterdam is not a good case study for legalisation. For one thing, it's not legal - just heavily decriminalised. NL have a pretty ridiculous system whereby criminal gangs remain in control of the entire supply line and there's basically nothing the government can do about it because they have grown so poweful. I believe the long term goal of this new policy is to starve the gangs of income from tourism so the government can take control of the industry and enact sensible reforms. Nobody should be seeking to replicate what they have over there. America and Canada provide much better examples because the industry is actually regulated, which is what most proponents for legalisation argue for.
My case study was relating to the mindset of cannabis users in Amsterdam, which is likely similar to those in the UK. If there genuinely is a worrying interdependence between hard and soft drugs, and assuming cannabis is a gateway drug, legalising it would be reckless. Maybe I'm risk-averse when it comes to drugs, but the few people I have known who took cannabis all went onto Class As.
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Fenneko
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#17
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#17
(Original post by Crazed cat lady)
As someone who generally believes individuals are far better placed to make decisions about their own lives rather than relying on the government to carry them through life, yes.
Nonsense. A society needs direction and rules. People shouldn't have the freedom to fail. After all, it's a government's duty to make sure it's steering its inhabitants towards prosperity. Recreational drugs, like cannabis, are nothing but harmful to its users, and also to those who try to live responsible lives.

Nothing good can come from the legalisation of cannabis. It will be one of the single greatest mistakes we will ever make, and one that is irreversible.
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londonmyst
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#18
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#18
(Original post by Crazed cat lady)
As someone who generally believes individuals are far better placed to make decisions about their own lives rather than relying on the government to carry them through life, yes.
Do you believe the same thing when it comes to illegal narcotics like crystal meth, commercial surrogacy, the sale of eggs for ivf or blood/organs for medical treatment and research?
Only in relation to healthy adults with mental capacity being allowed to make the decision.
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londonmyst
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#19
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#19
(Original post by Fenneko)
Recreational drugs, like cannabis, are nothing but harmful to its users, and also to those who try to live responsible lives.
Nothing good can come from the legalisation of cannabis.
It will be one of the single greatest mistakes we will ever make, and one that is irreversible.
PRSOM.

People often say that legalisation will open up a substantial sum of tax revenue & will provide a well paid source of employment for some of those who would otherwise by dependent upon welfare funds.
Or opt for a life of habitual criminality inherently connected to the 'taxfree cash in hand economy', blackmarket environments and living almost entirely/completely off-grid.
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DSilva
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#20
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#20
(Original post by JOSH4598)
I didn't (as I would have thought it's common sense that making something legal would result in more people using it, than when it was illegal). However a quick search reveals Amsterdam are trying to ban tourists from consuming cannabis there due to a "worrying interdependence between the soft and hard drug trade". I would have thought Amsterdam is a good example for us here in the UK, compared to the US which is remarkably different in terms of policing. People seem to skim over the possibility that hard drugs could become more widely-used, not knowing how devastating drugs can be.
No that wasn't your argument. Your argument was that legalising marjuiana would lead to more people doing 'harder' drugs. That's a claim which requires evidence. You don't have the evidence because it doesn't exist. The 'gateway' theory is unsubstantiated and discretited. You'd think that you'd have researched it, but I guess that was too much effort.
(Original post by Fenneko)
Nonsense. A society needs direction and rules. People shouldn't have the freedom to fail. After all, it's a government's duty to make sure it's steering its inhabitants towards prosperity. Recreational drugs, like cannabis, are nothing but harmful to its users, and also to those who try to live responsible lives.

Nothing good can come from the legalisation of cannabis. It will be one of the single greatest mistakes we will ever make, and one that is irreversible.
Interesting to see the horseshoe theory in action here. Both the hard right and hard left think people are incapable of making their own choices and need a big nanny state to tell them what they can and can't do.
Last edited by DSilva; 22 hours ago
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