The Student Room Group

Tfl fare evasion

I have been asked by a few people about my experience with fare evasion so I’ll give a a brief overview. I was caught by chiltern an evading a fare and was given an intended prosecution letter, the same happened to my friend recently. I will say I was highly anxious about this, but my advice would be not to worry… as long as you respond to the letter and show you are highly apologetic asking to settle outside of court you’ll be fine! I mentioned how a criminal charge would look very bad for future job prospects. I received an offer of £300 which I had to pay, my friend received an offer of £70. Once you pay that it’ll all go away. I received no criminal charge thank god.
Original post by anniiiii
I have been asked by a few people about my experience with fare evasion so I’ll give a a brief overview. I was caught by chiltern an evading a fare and was given an intended prosecution letter, the same happened to my friend recently. I will say I was highly anxious about this, but my advice would be not to worry… as long as you respond to the letter and show you are highly apologetic asking to settle outside of court you’ll be fine! I mentioned how a criminal charge would look very bad for future job prospects. I received an offer of £300 which I had to pay, my friend received an offer of £70. Once you pay that it’ll all go away. I received no criminal charge thank god.


I've moved your thread to a more appropriate place in the forums. In future, please check if your thread could be posted elsewhere. Thank-you!
How many offences did you commit? was it just the one? in my letter it says i may have avoided the correct fee up to 77 times. am i screwed or what?
Original post by student987789x
How many offences did you commit? was it just the one? in my letter it says i may have avoided the correct fee up to 77 times. am i screwed or what?


What did the letter say? Can you give us an update on your situation please
Reply 4
Original post by student987789x
How many offences did you commit? was it just the one? in my letter it says i may have avoided the correct fee up to 77 times. am i screwed or what?


judging by TfL's stance on fare evasion, they've recently been cracking down on it a lot more. 77 is a LARGE list of individual offences for fraud. You'd be lucky if they don't take you to court and give you a criminal charge, and just make you pay for every ticket you were supposed to
(edited 8 months ago)
Reply 5
Original post by anniiiii
I have been asked by a few people about my experience with fare evasion so I’ll give a a brief overview. I was caught by chiltern an evading a fare and was given an intended prosecution letter, the same happened to my friend recently. I will say I was highly anxious about this, but my advice would be not to worry… as long as you respond to the letter and show you are highly apologetic asking to settle outside of court you’ll be fine! I mentioned how a criminal charge would look very bad for future job prospects. I received an offer of £300 which I had to pay, my friend received an offer of £70. Once you pay that it’ll all go away. I received no criminal charge thank god.


Hey annii. Thanks for this as I’ve been extremely anxious about this and it has settled my anxiety a bit. How long did the letter take to come,
Reply 6
Original post by nyahnyah02
Hey annii. Thanks for this as I’ve been extremely anxious about this and it has settled my anxiety a bit. How long did the letter take to come,


Hi!

Just wanted to try give a bit of assurance.

Without knowing the details of the case it’s hard to comment, but the general process is as follows:

Following the incident, the train operating company (TOC) has exactly 6 months within which they can initiate legal proceedings. This means the letter can take up to 6 months to arrive.

When it does arrive, you will be asked to respond with your version of events. It is important to highlight that there are two possible outcomes:

1) The TOC agrees to settle the matter out of court. This will involve you paying a sum of money to the TOC (normally the full single fare for the journey + any admin costs the TOC has incurred in investigating the matter. In total, this normally adds up to the full fare + roughly £100).

2) The TOC proceeds with a prosecution in the magistrates court. In this instance, you will be given a Single Justice Procedure Notice (SJPN) and asked to plead either guilty or not guilty (an early guilty plea reduces the fine amount by 33%).

Option 1 is practically always cheaper than option 2 and is the more desirable one. To maximise the chance of getting option 1, it is important to respond to the letter sent from the TOC in an apologetic and constructive manner. Apologise for your mistake, briefly outline what you have learned and what you will change going forward, and offer to pay any outstanding costs and admin fees.

I advise you to post a thread on the website below. This forum is home to a number of experts who specialise in and study rail fares and contract law and are best placed to offer you assistance:

https://www.railforums.co.uk/forums/disputes-prosecutions.152/

If you need any help or clarification on anything at all, feel free to ask and I’ll try my best to answer as well as I can! :smile:
Reply 7
Hi are you able to share what you had written, my partner is in the same boat
Reply 8
Original post by DMCG1801
Hi!

Just wanted to try give a bit of assurance.

Without knowing the details of the case it’s hard to comment, but the general process is as follows:

Following the incident, the train operating company (TOC) has exactly 6 months within which they can initiate legal proceedings. This means the letter can take up to 6 months to arrive.

When it does arrive, you will be asked to respond with your version of events. It is important to highlight that there are two possible outcomes:

1) The TOC agrees to settle the matter out of court. This will involve you paying a sum of money to the TOC (normally the full single fare for the journey + any admin costs the TOC has incurred in investigating the matter. In total, this normally adds up to the full fare + roughly £100).

2) The TOC proceeds with a prosecution in the magistrates court. In this instance, you will be given a Single Justice Procedure Notice (SJPN) and asked to plead either guilty or not guilty (an early guilty plea reduces the fine amount by 33%).

Option 1 is practically always cheaper than option 2 and is the more desirable one. To maximise the chance of getting option 1, it is important to respond to the letter sent from the TOC in an apologetic and constructive manner. Apologise for your mistake, briefly outline what you have learned and what you will change going forward, and offer to pay any outstanding costs and admin fees.

I advise you to post a thread on the website below. This forum is home to a number of experts who specialise in and study rail fares and contract law and are best placed to offer you assistance:

https://www.railforums.co.uk/forums/disputes-prosecutions.152/

If you need any help or clarification on anything at all, feel free to ask and I’ll try my best to answer as well as I can! :smile:

Hi,

I know someone who is in a similar position and wanted to ask how likely it is for TFL to not decide to prosecute if you write a heart felt letter and apologise and offer to pay any outstanding fees as you mentioned.

He is really worried about how if it goes onto court- how it will affect his future and if instead he should try go the legal route and get a lawyer but this is really expensive or reply himself?

Any guidance would be so so appreciated! :smile:
Reply 9
Original post by anniiiii
I have been asked by a few people about my experience with fare evasion so I’ll give a a brief overview. I was caught by chiltern an evading a fare and was given an intended prosecution letter, the same happened to my friend recently. I will say I was highly anxious about this, but my advice would be not to worry… as long as you respond to the letter and show you are highly apologetic asking to settle outside of court you’ll be fine! I mentioned how a criminal charge would look very bad for future job prospects. I received an offer of £300 which I had to pay, my friend received an offer of £70. Once you pay that it’ll all go away. I received no criminal charge thank god.

Who did you write the letter to ?
Original post by student987789x
How many offences did you commit? was it just the one? in my letter it says i may have avoided the correct fee up to 77 times. am i screwed or what?

Hello ,

How did you settle your matter ? Did you have to pay a fine ?

Quick Reply

Latest