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Msc in QS (International student)

It's complicated... I will try my best to break down my issues:

My ultimate objective is to migrate to a developed country and change my life.

1. I had my two-year post grad visa in the UK. I realised the legal field is saturated and training contracts are highly competitive. No way employers will pay thousands pound immigration surcharge for a foreigner if they can find someone in the local market. And the minimum salary threshold 26200k per year just mades it even not realistic for us to apply for a T-2 visa except joining a grad scheme.

2. I want to change my career to QS as it has a better career prospect. It is under the critical skilled worker shortage list of many countries, i.e., Australia, New Zealand, Germany and Ireland. And RICS accredited course is admitted in my home country (Malaysia) and also Singapore and Hong Kong.

3. Course selection
I looked into so so so many websites. I am really interested in the course offered by Bayes (previously known as Cass) Business School as they combine both commercial consulting and technical measuring sides. I am also looking into Henley Business School. However, the overall ranking of both is not great. I am scared what if I cannot secure a grad scheme in the UK then it will put me in an awkward situation?
University of Manchester and UCL have a great Msc in Real Estate course however they are more on consulting side and it is not what I am looking for. BUT the graduates are highly sought after in Asian countries due to their high ranking.

I AM CONFUSED. Could someone advise the job market please? I have to take my time seriously cuz tuition fee is not student friendly and I don't want to waste my parents' hard earned money if ends up going back to Asia.

Thank you :smile:
Original post by Sam Chua
It's complicated... I will try my best to break down my issues:

My ultimate objective is to migrate to a developed country and change my life.

1. I had my two-year post grad visa in the UK. I realised the legal field is saturated and training contracts are highly competitive. No way employers will pay thousands pound immigration surcharge for a foreigner if they can find someone in the local market. And the minimum salary threshold 26200k per year just mades it even not realistic for us to apply for a T-2 visa except joining a grad scheme.

2. I want to change my career to QS as it has a better career prospect. It is under the critical skilled worker shortage list of many countries, i.e., Australia, New Zealand, Germany and Ireland. And RICS accredited course is admitted in my home country (Malaysia) and also Singapore and Hong Kong.

3. Course selection
I looked into so so so many websites. I am really interested in the course offered by Bayes (previously known as Cass) Business School as they combine both commercial consulting and technical measuring sides. I am also looking into Henley Business School. However, the overall ranking of both is not great. I am scared what if I cannot secure a grad scheme in the UK then it will put me in an awkward situation?
University of Manchester and UCL have a great Msc in Real Estate course however they are more on consulting side and it is not what I am looking for. BUT the graduates are highly sought after in Asian countries due to their high ranking.

I AM CONFUSED. Could someone advise the job market please? I have to take my time seriously cuz tuition fee is not student friendly and I don't want to waste my parents' hard earned money if ends up going back to Asia.

Thank you :smile:


My ultimate objective is to migrate to a developed country and change my life.
I like how people are trying to migrate to developed countries from developing countries to find a better life, and then how people from developed countries can't wait to leave to get into developing countries for an easier life. At some point someone will consider this ridiculous.

1. I had my two-year post grad visa in the UK. I realised the legal field is saturated and training contracts are highly competitive.
If the job is competitive, it will be competitive irrespective of the country. You can try looking into Canada and US, but the situation will be similar to that in the UK. You might have an easier time getting a green card in Canada, but getting the job will be ast least as difficult. (I don't work in law just as a disclaimer.)

3. Course selection
I'm very hesitant to advise because I firstly don't know about the employment prospects in Asian countries, but secondly I don't work in the sector.
If you look at the RICS website to look for RICS accredited degrees (https://www.ricscourses.org/), you will notice that a number of the universities that offer accredited courses in surveying aren't that high. This is partly because RICS isn't really academic per se, and a lot of the courses will follow a specific curriculum in order to receive the RICS accreditation (in other words, they all should be roughly the same in terms of content).
If you're only restricting the search to QS, UK universities, and postgrad degrees, out of the 123 courses available, only a handful of universities with high rankings would pop up (e.g. UCL).
I don't know enough about the job market in Asian countries to confirm whether the institution where you got your degree from will matter that much, but the end result is to convince the other person on the other side of the table to give you the job. Whether you would need a high ranking university to do that despite having a professionally accredited degree is up for debate.

That's just my 2 cents in this though.
Reply 2
How much do you know about quantity surveying and masters degrees in the U.K.? If considering emigrating to Australia wouldn’t it be better to look for a course there?
Reply 3
Hiya thank you for replying.

It is indeed. Receiving a higher education in a developed country- you want to migrate to- is to demonstrate you being able to integrate into the society. Paying enormous amount of tuition fees is just like paying an entrance ticket to set our foot in the door of the country :frown: It is not easy.

I compared US, Canada, Australia, UK and Germany. UK comes to the lowest cost compared to all other countries I listed before. Even studying in Singapore, it costs roughly $50k SG dollar.

I have sheer amount of determination. I even self studied ATT/CTA qualification when holding my grad visa. I came from non-business/finance background but I was able to pass two computer based papers and one mandatory income tax paper in one sitting. However this qualification is only recognised by certain countries and I was not able to secure a tax graduate scheme in big 4; I had to give it all up as there's no way for me to apply my technical knowledge in real life due to my visa restrictions.

Nobody around me ever studies in US/Canada. I am not resourceful. Even when I first came to the UK I am the first person from my village who made it. Plus the cost factor (US and Canada).. I did not really look into them any further. I want to change my life. But I don't want to be a selfish human being spending my parents' retirement funds just for my own sake.

I might apply for Chevening and Commonwealth Scholarship. Pros are tuition fees will be waived, and I can get monthly stipend. Cons are I have to return to my home countries serving for two years immediately after my course ends.

I will apply UCL international real estate and planning. Because why not? Just open up my options.

Thank you for your reply.

Original post by MindMax2000
My ultimate objective is to migrate to a developed country and change my life.
I like how people are trying to migrate to developed countries from developing countries to find a better life, and then how people from developed countries can't wait to leave to get into developing countries for an easier life. At some point someone will consider this ridiculous.

1. I had my two-year post grad visa in the UK. I realised the legal field is saturated and training contracts are highly competitive.
If the job is competitive, it will be competitive irrespective of the country. You can try looking into Canada and US, but the situation will be similar to that in the UK. You might have an easier time getting a green card in Canada, but getting the job will be ast least as difficult. (I don't work in law just as a disclaimer.)

3. Course selection
I'm very hesitant to advise because I firstly don't know about the employment prospects in Asian countries, but secondly I don't work in the sector.
If you look at the RICS website to look for RICS accredited degrees (https://www.ricscourses.org/), you will notice that a number of the universities that offer accredited courses in surveying aren't that high. This is partly because RICS isn't really academic per se, and a lot of the courses will follow a specific curriculum in order to receive the RICS accreditation (in other words, they all should be roughly the same in terms of content).
If you're only restricting the search to QS, UK universities, and postgrad degrees, out of the 123 courses available, only a handful of universities with high rankings would pop up (e.g. UCL).
I don't know enough about the job market in Asian countries to confirm whether the institution where you got your degree from will matter that much, but the end result is to convince the other person on the other side of the table to give you the job. Whether you would need a high ranking university to do that despite having a professionally accredited degree is up for debate.

That's just my 2 cents in this though.
Reply 4
Hiya

I have asked my relatives who's in oil & gas industry, researched the role profile and connected people on Linkedin. I would say I have developed a thorough understanding of the day in day out. What I like it the most is it allows me to travel and relocate and work on site. This is the exact reason why I chose the career. Once I am trained and become experience, I can apply for relocation/secondment to another country and I will be more in demand if becomes chartered.

Master degree in Australia lasts 2-3 years. Living cost and tuition fees are way too high. I dont think I can afford it. Therefore this is the reason I choose to study in the UK/HK/Singapore then maybe get 2-3 years experience and migrate to a developed country.
Original post by ajj2000
How much do you know about quantity surveying and masters degrees in the U.K.? If considering emigrating to Australia wouldn’t it be better to look for a course there?
Reply 5
Original post by Sam Chua
Hiya

I have asked my relatives who's in oil & gas industry, researched the role profile and connected people on Linkedin. I would say I have developed a thorough understanding of the day in day out. What I like it the most is it allows me to travel and relocate and work on site. This is the exact reason why I chose the career. Once I am trained and become experience, I can apply for relocation/secondment to another country and I will be more in demand if becomes chartered.

Master degree in Australia lasts 2-3 years. Living cost and tuition fees are way too high. I dont think I can afford it. Therefore this is the reason I choose to study in the UK/HK/Singapore then maybe get 2-3 years experience and migrate to a developed country.

Sounds like a good plan to me. I know a lot of QSs and think your background sounds really valuable. I would check on some Aus immigration forums for advice.

As a note for UK specific universities I don't think the reputable QS masters are often (if ever) those at traditional high ranking universities. The top construction firms and consultancies send their undergrad apprentices and grad trainees to a range of universities most of which are former polytechnics. If one university stands out for quantity surveying it is Reading which is certainly something you should look at.

Loughborough have started an undergrad course. I don't know if they have a masters degree but that would be worth checking out.
Reply 6
Original post by ajj2000
Sounds like a good plan to me. I know a lot of QSs and think your background sounds really valuable. I would check on some Aus immigration forums for advice.

As a note for UK specific universities I don't think the reputable QS masters are often (if ever) those at traditional high ranking universities. The top construction firms and consultancies send their undergrad apprentices and grad trainees to a range of universities most of which are former polytechnics. If one university stands out for quantity surveying it is Reading which is certainly something you should look at.

Loughborough have started an undergrad course. I don't know if they have a masters degree but that would be worth checking out.

Hi Thank you. It's actually a cautious move for me. I still want to do a profession. QS is something I can build a career and it does not require me to have a civil engineering background. Also it involves construction laws and compliance that are what I am familiar with. I was advised that I can even switch my career to being an arbitrator in the future.

I am now looking into some contraction firms to attend their taster days/do shadowing. I will try to compare Reading (Henley Business School) and Cass in a table. TBH Loroughbourgh is not my option as I am still concerned with the overall international reputation aiiiii

Thanks!

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