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Will I end up with schizophrenia?

All of my older siblings have developed schizophrenia and as a result they have all been sectioned. My two older siblings weren’t really too much of a shock as they’ve never really been “normal” however very recently my supposedly healthy sister had a sudden psychotic episode and now she has been admitted too. They have all smoked cannabis in the past and I know that it can cause someone to develop schizophrenia but it’s just too odd for all of my siblings to end up with the same condition. I know the likelyhood is higher for those with family members with schizophrenia but aside from my older sisters and brother, we have no family history of any mental illness. I don’t smoke, I’ve never tried to self harm etc. but after my sister now I feel like I’m living on borrowed time. I know coincidences happen but it just doesn’t make sense for all of my siblings to suffer from the same illness, I feel like my family is cursed or something. I don’t even feel excited for the future anymore because I can’t shake the feeling that I won’t see it.
Reply 1
I know people will suggest counselling, therapy etc. but I feel like it wont help at all. The NHS ones are completely apathetic and make it obvious that they couldn’t care less and that just makes me feel worse. I already have very little faith in nhs mental health services as none of them seem to do anything until that person becomes a danger to others or does something illegal.
Talk about it with your GP - they can advise you on whether you are at higher risk of developing it or not and discuss your feelings about the possibility etc.

Additionally just because you have schizophrenia doesn't mean the world is over. It can be well controlled with medication and other treatment (e.g. types of therapy for helping you identify when you might be at risk of having a psychotic episode or similar) and allow you to do most of the things you would probably want to do. There are some things you might not be able to do - chances of becoming a jet fighter pilot are probably zilch in that case - but you may find provided you have the necessary support, life will go on as usual otherwise?
Reply 3
Original post by artful_lounger
Talk about it with your GP - they can advise you on whether you are at higher risk of developing it or not and discuss your feelings about the possibility etc.

Additionally just because you have schizophrenia doesn't mean the world is over. It can be well controlled with medication and other treatment (e.g. types of therapy for helping you identify when you might be at risk of having a psychotic episode or similar) and allow you to do most of the things you would probably want to do. There are some things you might not be able to do - chances of becoming a jet fighter pilot are probably zilch in that case - but you may find provided you have the necessary support, life will go on as usual otherwise?

From personal experience, they haven’t helped any of my siblings at all. My oldest sister can barely speak now and my eldest brother is only now getting released after spending 7 years in an institution. My other sister is refusing to take her medication and the hospital is doing nothing about it because “they can’t force her if she doesn’t want to”.
Maybe, maybe not, we don't know
My partner has two siblings with schizophrenia. They are approaching middle age and have never experienced any signs or symptoms so it is by no means a certainty even if there is a genetic component.
Original post by Anonymous
From personal experience, they haven’t helped any of my siblings at all. My oldest sister can barely speak now and my eldest brother is only now getting released after spending 7 years in an institution. My other sister is refusing to take her medication and the hospital is doing nothing about it because “they can’t force her if she doesn’t want to”.

Yes but that doesn't mean you can't or won't take any medication if you do end up with it - and there's a good chance you won't anyway.

I think the worry about potentially having schizophrenia is more of an issue for you currently? It's obviously something that concerns you greatly, so as I said worth talking about with your GP so you can understand what things might look like if you do develop schizophrenia - and they might well tell you there's a good chance you won't get it anyway.
Reply 7
Hey, you clearly know the more clinical and statistical side of things, but, you should book a GP appointment (it isn't a waste of their time) and speak about this with them. You might also want to try calling the Mind Infoline for some general information on this. Basically, the answer is 'maybe', Schizophrenia has a natural incidence of about 1% and in identical twin studies it is 50%, so there is a strong genetic component, however, that doesn't mean you will develop it.

I would advise not to do any drugs and even moderate your alcohol as some research shows that can set off FEP too which then could develop into schizophrenia.

Most importantly, i know psychosis has a lot of stigma and it is a really scary thing, but the treatment options that are now available are pretty great, even those with treatment resistant schizophrenia can find peace and a suitable treatment plan. You can be very successful and very happy with schizophrenia, I have Polymorphic Psychotic Disorder w/h Symptoms of Schizophrenia (basically randomly intermittent periods of paranoid psychosis) and this means I will most likely develop full on schizophrenia at some point in my life. I have also been hospitalized on a few occasions and received community treatment in other cases. But all that being said, I am a really successful person and I am about to become a barrister (hence why this is an anonymous reply), you can too. It is scary, but it isn't like it used to be and you can do so much even with these scary acute mental health difficulties.

My advice, outside of speaking to a GP, is actually to get involved in some psychosis support groups, google 'Epic Minds' or even reach out on some groups online.
Reply 8
No. I would echo what another poster said and avoid smoking and alcohol if you can help it. My extended family have schizophrenia and it runs in my bloodline too. My cousin developed it after excessive drug use. My friend also had schizophrenia run in his family. He also developed it after drug use. Avoid all drugs as cocaine and all other common drugs can trigger it. I also had this paranoia and have had psychosis in the past without schizophrenia. Just take care of yourself and do not worry too much about.
Reply 9
Original post by Anonymous
No. I would echo what another poster said and avoid smoking and alcohol if you can help it. My extended family have schizophrenia and it runs in my bloodline too. My cousin developed it after excessive drug use. My friend also had schizophrenia run in his family. He also developed it after drug use. Avoid all drugs as cocaine and all other common drugs can trigger it. I also had this paranoia and have had psychosis in the past without schizophrenia. Just take care of yourself and do not worry too much about.

If you don’t mind me asking, how long did your psychosis last? My sister recently had psychosis and it’s been a couple weeks or so now and she’s still in the same condition despite being sectioned
Reply 10
Original post by Anonymous
Hey, you clearly know the more clinical and statistical side of things, but, you should book a GP appointment (it isn't a waste of their time) and speak about this with them. You might also want to try calling the Mind Infoline for some general information on this. Basically, the answer is 'maybe', Schizophrenia has a natural incidence of about 1% and in identical twin studies it is 50%, so there is a strong genetic component, however, that doesn't mean you will develop it.

I would advise not to do any drugs and even moderate your alcohol as some research shows that can set off FEP too which then could develop into schizophrenia.

Most importantly, i know psychosis has a lot of stigma and it is a really scary thing, but the treatment options that are now available are pretty great, even those with treatment resistant schizophrenia can find peace and a suitable treatment plan. You can be very successful and very happy with schizophrenia, I have Polymorphic Psychotic Disorder w/h Symptoms of Schizophrenia (basically randomly intermittent periods of paranoid psychosis) and this means I will most likely develop full on schizophrenia at some point in my life. I have also been hospitalized on a few occasions and received community treatment in other cases. But all that being said, I am a really successful person and I am about to become a barrister (hence why this is an anonymous reply), you can too. It is scary, but it isn't like it used to be and you can do so much even with these scary acute mental health difficulties.

My advice, outside of speaking to a GP, is actually to get involved in some psychosis support groups, google 'Epic Minds' or even reach out on some groups online.

I’ve done a lot of research on schizophrenia and I’m avoiding any drugs and I avoid getting drunk. My main worry about developing schizophrenia is my mum. I’ve seen her breakdown 3 times for each of my siblings, the most recent one being the worst. I’m basically her only healthy child left and I know if I developed schizophrenia too it would break her. In one of my older sisters delusions she claimed that we were cursed by a family member, my mum is religious and brushed her off initially but after my other sister was sectioned recently I’ve noticed that she’s brought up what she said a few times now and I’m worried she’s starting to believe it. I don’t want anyone else in my family to suffer
The first time it lasted about 3 days, they gave me benzos at the hospital and it stopped it. The second time it lasted much longer like 7-9 days, but this psychosis was a symptom of another condition that I have (autistic catatonia). I haven't experienced psychosis since (this was in 2020). I do not have schizophrenia though so it's not worth comparing I don't think.
Original post by Anonymous
If you don’t mind me asking, how long did your psychosis last? My sister recently had psychosis and it’s been a couple weeks or so now and she’s still in the same condition despite being sectioned

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