The Student Room Group

UCAT advice

Having done my UCAT I scored in the 89th percentile with a score of 2870 and a Band 1. I would strongly recommend using medify as their mini mocks and mock exams reflect most of what comes up on the actual test. Personally I found that the official mocks on the UCAT website differed a lot in terms of levels of difficulty. In terms of accuracy official mock C was the most accurate when compared to my actual UCAT score, followed by official mock D, then B and then A.
For verbal reasoning be very wary of the time. Write specific timings on a piece of paper (or on the whiteboard given during the exam) to prevent yourself from losing track of time.
For decision making try to spend no more than a minute on syllogism questions. It’s better to leave more time for the easier questions (e.g probability) later on in the section. If it helps draw simple diagrams for the basic syllogisms and treat the longer syllogisms as you would for texts in the VR. Don’t overthink these because it can lead to you wasting your time and also check for any qualifiers, statements like these often tend to have “no” answers. Also make sure your whiteboard pen provided during the exam works before starting this section as to avoid any interruptions.
For quantitive reasoning, make sure that you know some basic mathematical equations (e.g area of a triangle/ trapezium/ formulae for speed) Most conversions will be provided so just be aware of the basic ones (e.g 10000cm squared= 1 metre squared). This section is rather time pressured (36 questions in 25 minutes) so definitely don’t dwell on any questions that require more than 3 step calculations. Or if you come across a certain question type that you know you struggle with occasionally, guess, flag and skip. If you have time come back to try the question.
Abstract reasoning was the most difficult section for me since I was always scoring below the average on the mini mocks and mocks on modify in this section. You could write or take note of every pattern you failed to recognise and try to memorise it, but personally I found that to be too much work. I ended up scoring 720 on this section by just completing 120-150 questions a day on abstract reasoning 2 weeks leading up to my exam. After completing an extensive amount of questions you begin to recognise patterns being repeated or having any similarities to previous patterns you’ve seen before.
SJT is also a section that can be improved with extensive practice. During my actual UCAT exam I recognised very similar passages that I had read in Medify. Don’t overthink this section and only review your flagged questions once since you could end up changing a once correct answer into an incorrect one.
After completing each section don’t focus on how badly or well you’ve done since this could affect yours scores in the following sections. This just puts extra pressure on you and can further stress you out, possibly leading to more careless mistakes. Just try your best in each section regardless of how you did in the previous section.
On the test day do as minimal practice as you can as not to tire you out. I would recommend keeping some summarised notes on which techniques work best for you on each section of the UCAT and just reading through them. Don’t rush into to the test centre trying to get the test done ASAP because you might end up forgetting key items (e.g glasses or admission form). Try to relax before the exam and use the 1 minute gaps between each section to take mental breaks.
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Reply 2
Original post by medstudent4353
Having done my UCAT I scored in the 89th percentile with a score of 2870 and a Band 1. I would strongly recommend using medify as their mini mocks and mock exams reflect most of what comes up on the actual test. Personally I found that the official mocks on the UCAT website differed a lot in terms of levels of difficulty. In terms of accuracy official mock C was the most accurate when compared to my actual UCAT score, followed by official mock D, then B and then A.
For verbal reasoning be very wary of the time. Write specific timings on a piece of paper (or on the whiteboard given during the exam) to prevent yourself from losing track of time.
For decision making try to spend no more than a minute on syllogism questions. It’s better to leave more time for the easier questions (e.g probability) later on in the section. If it helps draw simple diagrams for the basic syllogisms and treat the longer syllogisms as you would for texts in the VR. Don’t overthink these because it can lead to you wasting your time and also check for any qualifiers, statements like these often tend to have “no” answers. Also make sure your whiteboard pen provided during the exam works before starting this section as to avoid any interruptions.
For quantitive reasoning, make sure that you know some basic mathematical equations (e.g area of a triangle/ trapezium/ formulae for speed) Most conversions will be provided so just be aware of the basic ones (e.g 10000cm squared= 1 metre squared). This section is rather time pressured (36 questions in 25 minutes) so definitely don’t dwell on any questions that require more than 3 step calculations. Or if you come across a certain question type that you know you struggle with occasionally, guess, flag and skip. If you have time come back to try the question.
Abstract reasoning was the most difficult section for me since I was always scoring below the average on the mini mocks and mocks on modify in this section. You could write or take note of every pattern you failed to recognise and try to memorise it, but personally I found that to be too much work. I ended up scoring 720 on this section by just completing 120-150 questions a day on abstract reasoning 2 weeks leading up to my exam. After completing an extensive amount of questions you begin to recognise patterns being repeated or having any similarities to previous patterns you’ve seen before.
SJT is also a section that can be improved with extensive practice. During my actual UCAT exam I recognised very similar passages that I had read in Medify. Don’t overthink this section and only review your flagged questions once since you could end up changing a once correct answer into an incorrect one.
After completing each section don’t focus on how badly or well you’ve done since this could affect yours scores in the following sections. This just puts extra pressure on you and can further stress you out, possibly leading to more careless mistakes. Just try your best in each section regardless of how you did in the previous section.
On the test day do as minimal practice as you can as not to tire you out. I would recommend keeping some summarised notes on which techniques work best for you on each section of the UCAT and just reading through them. Don’t rush into to the test centre trying to get the test done ASAP because you might end up forgetting key items (e.g glasses or admission form). Try to relax before the exam and use the 1 minute gaps between each section to take mental breaks.


hi, I have my test in under a week and was just wondering what u averaged overall in the medify mocks, Ive practised quite a bit but am stuck at around 2400 in each mock- and its so demotivating.
Reply 3
Original post by medstudent4353
Having done my UCAT I scored in the 89th percentile with a score of 2870 and a Band 1. I would strongly recommend using medify as their mini mocks and mock exams reflect most of what comes up on the actual test. Personally I found that the official mocks on the UCAT website differed a lot in terms of levels of difficulty. In terms of accuracy official mock C was the most accurate when compared to my actual UCAT score, followed by official mock D, then B and then A.
For verbal reasoning be very wary of the time. Write specific timings on a piece of paper (or on the whiteboard given during the exam) to prevent yourself from losing track of time.
For decision making try to spend no more than a minute on syllogism questions. It’s better to leave more time for the easier questions (e.g probability) later on in the section. If it helps draw simple diagrams for the basic syllogisms and treat the longer syllogisms as you would for texts in the VR. Don’t overthink these because it can lead to you wasting your time and also check for any qualifiers, statements like these often tend to have “no” answers. Also make sure your whiteboard pen provided during the exam works before starting this section as to avoid any interruptions.
For quantitive reasoning, make sure that you know some basic mathematical equations (e.g area of a triangle/ trapezium/ formulae for speed) Most conversions will be provided so just be aware of the basic ones (e.g 10000cm squared= 1 metre squared). This section is rather time pressured (36 questions in 25 minutes) so definitely don’t dwell on any questions that require more than 3 step calculations. Or if you come across a certain question type that you know you struggle with occasionally, guess, flag and skip. If you have time come back to try the question.
Abstract reasoning was the most difficult section for me since I was always scoring below the average on the mini mocks and mocks on modify in this section. You could write or take note of every pattern you failed to recognise and try to memorise it, but personally I found that to be too much work. I ended up scoring 720 on this section by just completing 120-150 questions a day on abstract reasoning 2 weeks leading up to my exam. After completing an extensive amount of questions you begin to recognise patterns being repeated or having any similarities to previous patterns you’ve seen before.
SJT is also a section that can be improved with extensive practice. During my actual UCAT exam I recognised very similar passages that I had read in Medify. Don’t overthink this section and only review your flagged questions once since you could end up changing a once correct answer into an incorrect one.
After completing each section don’t focus on how badly or well you’ve done since this could affect yours scores in the following sections. This just puts extra pressure on you and can further stress you out, possibly leading to more careless mistakes. Just try your best in each section regardless of how you did in the previous section.
On the test day do as minimal practice as you can as not to tire you out. I would recommend keeping some summarised notes on which techniques work best for you on each section of the UCAT and just reading through them. Don’t rush into to the test centre trying to get the test done ASAP because you might end up forgetting key items (e.g glasses or admission form). Try to relax before the exam and use the 1 minute gaps between each section to take mental breaks.


and thank you so much for the advice!
Reply 4
Original post by lunar0
hi, I have my test in under a week and was just wondering what u averaged overall in the medify mocks, Ive practised quite a bit but am stuck at around 2400 in each mock- and its so demotivating.


what did you end up getting?
Original post by lunar0
hi, I have my test in under a week and was just wondering what u averaged overall in the medify mocks, Ive practised quite a bit but am stuck at around 2400 in each mock- and its so demotivating.


me too!! that happened to me but saw some improvement after a while. not doing he best in yhe official ucat mocks any tips?
Reply 6
Original post by medstudent4353
Having done my UCAT I scored in the 89th percentile with a score of 2870 and a Band 1. I would strongly recommend using medify as their mini mocks and mock exams reflect most of what comes up on the actual test. Personally I found that the official mocks on the UCAT website differed a lot in terms of levels of difficulty. In terms of accuracy official mock C was the most accurate when compared to my actual UCAT score, followed by official mock D, then B and then A.
For verbal reasoning be very wary of the time. Write specific timings on a piece of paper (or on the whiteboard given during the exam) to prevent yourself from losing track of time.
For decision making try to spend no more than a minute on syllogism questions. It’s better to leave more time for the easier questions (e.g probability) later on in the section. If it helps draw simple diagrams for the basic syllogisms and treat the longer syllogisms as you would for texts in the VR. Don’t overthink these because it can lead to you wasting your time and also check for any qualifiers, statements like these often tend to have “no” answers. Also make sure your whiteboard pen provided during the exam works before starting this section as to avoid any interruptions.
For quantitive reasoning, make sure that you know some basic mathematical equations (e.g area of a triangle/ trapezium/ formulae for speed) Most conversions will be provided so just be aware of the basic ones (e.g 10000cm squared= 1 metre squared). This section is rather time pressured (36 questions in 25 minutes) so definitely don’t dwell on any questions that require more than 3 step calculations. Or if you come across a certain question type that you know you struggle with occasionally, guess, flag and skip. If you have time come back to try the question.
Abstract reasoning was the most difficult section for me since I was always scoring below the average on the mini mocks and mocks on modify in this section. You could write or take note of every pattern you failed to recognise and try to memorise it, but personally I found that to be too much work. I ended up scoring 720 on this section by just completing 120-150 questions a day on abstract reasoning 2 weeks leading up to my exam. After completing an extensive amount of questions you begin to recognise patterns being repeated or having any similarities to previous patterns you’ve seen before.
SJT is also a section that can be improved with extensive practice. During my actual UCAT exam I recognised very similar passages that I had read in Medify. Don’t overthink this section and only review your flagged questions once since you could end up changing a once correct answer into an incorrect one.
After completing each section don’t focus on how badly or well you’ve done since this could affect yours scores in the following sections. This just puts extra pressure on you and can further stress you out, possibly leading to more careless mistakes. Just try your best in each section regardless of how you did in the previous section.
On the test day do as minimal practice as you can as not to tire you out. I would recommend keeping some summarised notes on which techniques work best for you on each section of the UCAT and just reading through them. Don’t rush into to the test centre trying to get the test done ASAP because you might end up forgetting key items (e.g glasses or admission form). Try to relax before the exam and use the 1 minute gaps between each section to take mental breaks.

What percentile would be 2730

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