The Student Room Group

Official Thread: Graduate Entry Medicine 2023 Entry

Welcome to the GEM 2023 entry thread.

Other useful threads
Medical Schools Index 2023 entry (for specific med school entry discussions): https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7247513
Undergrad Medicine 2023 entry discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=6902612
UCAT 2023 entry discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7161733
BMAT 2023 entry discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7211426
GAMSAT 2023 entry discussion: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7126849

Previous GEM threads
GEM 2022: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=6100344:
GEM 2021: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5332212
GEM 2020: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=4894790
GEM 2019: https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=4678924

General TSR rules:
(1) Please don't ask, mention or advertise group chats.
(2) Please don't ask for or post interview questions.
(3) Please don't offer to buy and sell items.

Good luck!


Post originally created by ecolier.
(edited 1 year ago)

Scroll to see replies

Hello! I'm planning on applying to study graduate entry medicine in 2 yrs - I'm about to start my final year of adult nursing, then I intend on working in infectious disease for 1 yr, then applying for GEM. I already know which uni's I'll be applying to, just want to make sure I can prep as thoroughly as possible for the entrance exam, so any advice is very welcome!! Thanks!
I’m also in a similar position to @Colette Maria, except that I study another type of AHP course. I also plan to begin GEM in September, of course, applying in October 2022. I have somewhat started preparing already not much, just looking at the schools, sorting finances, the entrance exams, etc. etc.

I am already applicable to a fair few GEM schools already, but I am looking to perhaps enhance my application by studying A-levels to become applicable to some other GEM schools (as I never studied A-levels when I was younger). This is for a personal goal of mine, with eyes set on some of the more “prestigious” schools which of course, have more requirements; but this belief may change.

I’ve started look at A-level Chemistry, Biology, and Maths, but a little lost on the whole practical element of the sciences. These, of course, need to be completed in most cases for those more “prestigious” schools. , are you aware of any threads on here about people who are in a similar situation? Thank you for putting this thread up by the way!
Thank you for the super speedy response and all the information you have provided, I'll be sure to check out the 2022 page. You're right, I think I'm just being roped into the things that actually do not really matter. How would you suggest learning more about the teaching styles in general in GEM schools, that go beyond the information provided on their webpages?

I'm thinking about starting to look at the schools themselves in person next year (subject to COVID-19 ofc).
Hi , are you aware of any threads that discuss sitting the A-level Chemistry w/ The Practical Element as an external candidate. Thanks again.
I am studying Biochemistry At UCL (1st year) and I am thinking of doing Graduate Entry Medicine in the UK. I am an Indian (non-EU resident) so is there a chance that I will get into a Graduate entry medicine course there after finishing Biochemistry?? Please let me know.
Hey folks!

I'm starting to explore the idea of graduate entry medicine and I'm a bit lost as to what the best steps should be in order to decide whether it's something I really want to do. Hopefully this is the right thread to post in - or perhaps you might be able to direct me to where I should post?

Some background:
I graduated with a first class theology degree in 2017. I'd started to become interested in medicine and the body from a humanities perspective during my final two years of my degree, and wrote my dissertation about chronic pain (obviously in relation to religion!). Since then I've toyed with the idea of studying medical anthropology, but cost/lack of real-life applicability have kept me from taking the plunge. However, I've continued to read around the subject, albeit always from a humanities perspective.

Then in the past 6 months, in an odd professional twist, I've found myself editing Biology and Physics textbooks for English second language speakers. While my job is about the English content, I've really enjoyed being reminded/retaught the Biology that I learnt at school - it definitely seems much more interesting to me now! I dropped all science and maths after GCSE and was very much a humanities students. I always thought that science wasn't for me, but I can see that might not actually be the case.

GEM 2023 entry:
These two things combined have made me start to consider in a more real way applying for graduate entry medicine. However, I'm unsure of the best ways to become clear about making this decision. If I were to start studying in 2023 I would already be 29! While I'm aware that that is not too late, it definitely makes me want to try and be as sure as possible about my decision.

Next steps:
From what I've gathered from my research so far, I think the three things I really need to do are:
1) Get some experience in a health care setting, whether voluntary or paid.
- I'm a bit worried that being slightly older and without a health care background will be a disadvantage. I'm not sure if my application would be taken seriously. On the other hand, I'm not sure that I want to take a professional shift without being sure that that is what I want to persue.

2) Study some science
- From my research, it seems like most places that accept humanities graduates don't need you to have science A-levels. However, I wonder if this would be good preperation? For example, to complete Biology and chemistry A levels.
- Alternatively, I could just prepare for the GAMAT, but then that seems very specialised, when I'm still testing the waters of what I want to do.

3) Talk to others who have entered GEM in their late twenties.
- Does anyone know where I could find people who have followed this route? A lot of GEM seems to be people straight out of university, which is obviously quite a different pathway to starting when you're nearly 30!
- Is there anyone else following this pathway whose a bit older? I'd love to hear how you're preparing?

In general I'd love to hear from others about their process in deciding to persue medicine and their backgrounds, particularly those who also come from a humanities background :smile:
Original post by Angelicus
Hey folks!

I'm starting to explore the idea of graduate entry medicine and I'm a bit lost as to what the best steps should be in order to decide whether it's something I really want to do. Hopefully this is the right thread to post in - or perhaps you might be able to direct me to where I should post?

Some background:
I graduated with a first class theology degree in 2017. I'd started to become interested in medicine and the body from a humanities perspective during my final two years of my degree, and wrote my dissertation about chronic pain (obviously in relation to religion!). Since then I've toyed with the idea of studying medical anthropology, but cost/lack of real-life applicability have kept me from taking the plunge. However, I've continued to read around the subject, albeit always from a humanities perspective.

Then in the past 6 months, in an odd professional twist, I've found myself editing Biology and Physics textbooks for English second language speakers. While my job is about the English content, I've really enjoyed being reminded/retaught the Biology that I learnt at school - it definitely seems much more interesting to me now! I dropped all science and maths after GCSE and was very much a humanities students. I always thought that science wasn't for me, but I can see that might not actually be the case.

GEM 2023 entry:
These two things combined have made me start to consider in a more real way applying for graduate entry medicine. However, I'm unsure of the best ways to become clear about making this decision. If I were to start studying in 2023 I would already be 29! While I'm aware that that is not too late, it definitely makes me want to try and be as sure as possible about my decision.

Next steps:
From what I've gathered from my research so far, I think the three things I really need to do are:
1) Get some experience in a health care setting, whether voluntary or paid.
- I'm a bit worried that being slightly older and without a health care background will be a disadvantage. I'm not sure if my application would be taken seriously. On the other hand, I'm not sure that I want to take a professional shift without being sure that that is what I want to persue.

2) Study some science
- From my research, it seems like most places that accept humanities graduates don't need you to have science A-levels. However, I wonder if this would be good preperation? For example, to complete Biology and chemistry A levels.
- Alternatively, I could just prepare for the GAMAT, but then that seems very specialised, when I'm still testing the waters of what I want to do.

3) Talk to others who have entered GEM in their late twenties.
- Does anyone know where I could find people who have followed this route? A lot of GEM seems to be people straight out of university, which is obviously quite a different pathway to starting when you're nearly 30!
- Is there anyone else following this pathway whose a bit older? I'd love to hear how you're preparing?

In general I'd love to hear from others about their process in deciding to persue medicine and their backgrounds, particularly those who also come from a humanities background :smile:

It's maaaad that when you all start GEM I'll have graduated that year.

Anyway,
1) What do you mean? Disadvantage to your med school applicaltion or disadvantage to places you could volunteer/work?
2) Depending on the medical school you go to, they'll teach you what you need to know. It would be beneficial to know the basics though to avoid additional stress at the beginning. Not to the point where you need to pay and sit A-levels but maybe a few GCSE and A-level videos on YouTube, such as Khan academy. Your GAMSAT prep would probably cover the basics depending on what kind of prep you choose to do.
3) The majority of people on my course are in their mid-late 20s and only a handful of them started straight after their previous degree. I would say this is probably a lot more common than you'd think. I don't know where your observations were made but it might be just that you're more likely to come across current university students who are applying to GEM straight out of their first degree on TSR. It certainly doesn't mean they get in first time and a lot of the 'older' people I know wouldn't use TSR or would at most just stalk.
Reply 9
Hi, I’m not applying for gem medicine this year as I am still doing my undergraduate degree. But I would like to know the process of the application, like do you apply to SGUL through ucas? Or is it a different way? When and how do you sit the gamsat/ucat?
Reply 10
Hello everybody!

I'm super early to the graduate entry medicine forum but it's for my own good and I'm trying to be as tactical as possible.

A little about me;
GCSE's; 5A*/5A
A-Levels; AAB (in Biology, Chemistry, Economics)
Degree; Global health (with Data Science) @ UCL
Work Experience; General hospital experience, dentistry work experience, work with special needs once a week and I tutor part-time.

I'm planning on taking the GAMSAT/UKCAT and BMAT. Seems very optimistic - I know.

Starting with the GAMSAT, when is the earliest I'd be able to sit the test if I intend on applying in 2022 for 2023 entry.

Also if you have any tips on getting some more work experience during this pandemic, I would really appreciate it! (By WE I mean suggestions of places to volunteer, any virtual ones you may know)


Thanks again!
-Mia
(edited 3 years ago)
Reply 11
Thank you so much!
So if I took the test in March 2021, I'd be okay using it for September 2023? I'm just confused because SGuL stated it had to be within a year and I was confused. It would be really nice being able to do it in March so if it goes well I have reasonable options if my UKCAT/BMAT flop.

Thanks again!
- Mia
Original post by Colette Maria
Hello! I'm planning on applying to study graduate entry medicine in 2 yrs - I'm about to start my final year of adult nursing, then I intend on working in infectious disease for 1 yr, then applying for GEM. I already know which uni's I'll be applying to, just want to make sure I can prep as thoroughly as possible for the entrance exam, so any advice is very welcome!! Thanks!

Hi! I am also in the same position as you! On my final year of adult nursing as well!
I am looking to do GEM once I complete my CompSci degree in 2023. I am currently applying to a couple of NHS bank roles to help build my experiences but what else do you thing I should be getting up to at the moment?

Any online courses/qualifications you would recommend I look into?

I am working full time as a Project Manager and my degree is online.

Thanks
Hi,

I'm currently doing my BSc in Mathematics at UCL (in my 2nd year), and I'm considering applying for Graduate Entry Medicine.

A Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics - A*A*A*A*
GCSEs: Maths, English Literature, English Language, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Computer Science, French, Religious Studies, Further Maths, Music - 3 9s, 6 A*s, 1 A^, 1 B
I haven't done any relevant work experience so far, but I do think I have some connections in place for me to arrange something in the future.
I think I'm on track for getting a 2:1, but I'm waiting for my latest exam results to gauge this better.
(I am a UK student)
My plan would be to take a year out, once I've finished my BSc, to complete necessary work experience and focus on doing well on the UCAT etc, and then apply to anywhere that would take me.

Any advice for me? - Is this realistic, do I actually stand a chance of getting in, where could I apply, how competitive are the places?

In terms of places to apply to, so far all I've seen is Sheffield. I'd like to stay as close to Sheffield/Doncaster as possible as then I have a chance at living at home whilst studying, which would save me a ton of money.

Thanks in advance!
Original post by thenbhd
Hi,

I'm currently doing my BSc in Mathematics at UCL (in my 2nd year), and I'm considering applying for Graduate Entry Medicine.

A Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics - A*A*A*A*
GCSEs: Maths, English Literature, English Language, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Computer Science, French, Religious Studies, Further Maths, Music - 3 9s, 6 A*s, 1 A^, 1 B
I haven't done any relevant work experience so far, but I do think I have some connections in place for me to arrange something in the future.
I think I'm on track for getting a 2:1, but I'm waiting for my latest exam results to gauge this better.
(I am a UK student)
My plan would be to take a year out, once I've finished my BSc, to complete necessary work experience and focus on doing well on the UCAT etc, and then apply to anywhere that would take me.

Any advice for me? - Is this realistic, do I actually stand a chance of getting in, where could I apply, how competitive are the places?

In terms of places to apply to, so far all I've seen is Sheffield. I'd like to stay as close to Sheffield/Doncaster as possible as then I have a chance at living at home whilst studying, which would save me a ton of money.

Thanks in advance!

Also, is Graduate Entry the accelerated program (4 years)? Am I allowed to apply to the standard Medicine course (5-6) years, and is this less competitive?
Reply 16
Original post by thenbhd
Hi,

I'm currently doing my BSc in Mathematics at UCL (in my 2nd year), and I'm considering applying for Graduate Entry Medicine.

A Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry, Physics - A*A*A*A*
GCSEs: Maths, English Literature, English Language, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Computer Science, French, Religious Studies, Further Maths, Music - 3 9s, 6 A*s, 1 A^, 1 B
I haven't done any relevant work experience so far, but I do think I have some connections in place for me to arrange something in the future.
I think I'm on track for getting a 2:1, but I'm waiting for my latest exam results to gauge this better.
(I am a UK student)
My plan would be to take a year out, once I've finished my BSc, to complete necessary work experience and focus on doing well on the UCAT etc, and then apply to anywhere that would take me.

Any advice for me? - Is this realistic, do I actually stand a chance of getting in, where could I apply, how competitive are the places?

In terms of places to apply to, so far all I've seen is Sheffield. I'd like to stay as close to Sheffield/Doncaster as possible as then I have a chance at living at home whilst studying, which would save me a ton of money.

Thanks in advance!

Sheffield's A101 is actually only open to applicants who meet their widening participation criteria, and as mentioned, you need a life science degree to apply, too.
You could apply to A100 at Sheffield, as I think they accept non-bioscience degrees, but you do not get tuition fee loans for A100 courses, if you are a grad. If you have no real living expenses, you could always use your maintenance loan towards tuition fees, but it is still going to cost you some money up front.
Other options close-ish by may be Nottingham's GEM, or the A100s at Nottingham, Lincoln, Manchester, Leeds or possibly HYMS, but some of those are a good commute and placements may be the other side of them.

A101s that would take your degree are Warwick, Nottingham, Swansea, Cambridge, Newcastle, Barts (but really need a 1st to apply), Scotgem, Southampton and SGUL. That is a mix if UCAT and GAMSAT, so a fair bit of prep, and the UCAT scores needed for those using it are likely to be well in excess of 700
It's nice to feel like I belong somewhere now :tongue:
I'm in my first year of Biomedicine at UEA. I was a poorly teen (heart condition) and missed a lot of my GCSE period, took childcare so I could just have fun and took a few years out to start a family and get my own house, car etc. Then I hit 20 and was feeling my intellectual capabilities were dwindling so I went back to education and started working as a HCA. Im 21 now and on my first year of my Biomedicine degree, but I really would like to do medicine in the long run. It was more financially viable for me to do a 3 year degree than spend a year or two redoing GCSEs and Alevels as I wouldnt have had a maintenance loan.

Last year I did an access course in science and now I'm in the researching everything about GEM stage.

Hyped for 2023 already 😅
(edited 3 years ago)
So 2023 GEM, when is everyone going to start revising for UCAT/GAMSAT and how?
Thank you for your reply :biggrin: Is it a good idea (if i can afford it) to do UCAT in 2021 as well as a "practice round" or would I be landed with that score/have to declare it?

Quick Reply