The Student Room Group

What kind of effects would it have if an underweight person has fizzy drink every day

Or nearly every day? Like when I was under the eating disorder service they told me to have flavoured milk (probably because it's high in calories and fat content which annoys me) and not fizzy drink as they aren't good for you. I still prefer fizzy drink to flavoured milk. They didn't say anything about the other things that I was having like sweets and doughnuts.
TSR is not a good venue for repeated requests for medical advice. Most people here are students and people answering could be as young as 13.
Reply 2
Original post by Admit-One
TSR is not a good venue for repeated requests for medical advice. Most people here are students and people answering could be as young as 13.

There's people going through similar or the same thing though and there is a health section. I don't post about everything to do with my health but it's good if someone tells you you have nothing to worry about.

As in I am sure there are people with Anorexia nervosa in the world and on this forum.
Original post by Anonymous
There's people going through similar or the same thing though and there is a health section. I don't post about everything to do with my health but it's good if someone tells you you have nothing to worry about.

As in I am sure there are people with Anorexia nervosa in the world and on this forum.


There are but they don’t make use the forum in the same way after disengaging with health services.

Someone with a similar condition can empathise but they won’t be best placed to give you nutritional guidance. Again, you don’t know who is replying, how old they are, or what their background is.
Reply 4
Original post by Admit-One
There are but they don’t make use the forum in the same way after disengaging with health services.

Someone with a similar condition can empathise but they won’t be best placed to give you nutritional guidance. Again, you don’t know who is replying, how old they are, or what their background is.

I have other things as well that may affect my eating like my birth defect which affects 1 in 30,000 to 1 in 100,000 babies so I guess people won't be able to answer specific questions about my case.
Reply 5
Original post by Admit-One
There are but they don’t make use the forum in the same way after disengaging with health services.

Someone with a similar condition can empathise but they won’t be best placed to give you nutritional guidance. Again, you don’t know who is replying, how old they are, or what their background is.

I actually prefer speaking to random strangers than my GP since it's nearly impossible to get a face to face appointment and sometimes I do need to be seen face to face. It's also very very difficult to even get a phone appointment as we have to call at exactly 8am and then we are in a queue of 20 something people and by the time the receptionist picks up there are no more appointments. With these appointments you can only speak about one health problem and they may even keep asking why I am asking so many questions and being paranoid or am I a hypochondriac if you call up and make appointments just to ask one question.

In the case of eating problems, if I speak to doctors (GP even) they will harass you to ensure I put on weight. Speaking to strangers would mean there is no one to harass you and you can gain weight at your own pace (or basically means you won't end up putting on weight at all).
Reply 6
The same effects it would have on a non-underweight person? Google is your friend.
(edited 4 months ago)
Reply 7
Original post by Anonymous
Or nearly every day? Like when I was under the eating disorder service they told me to have flavoured milk (probably because it's high in calories and fat content which annoys me) and not fizzy drink as they aren't good for you. I still prefer fizzy drink to flavoured milk. They didn't say anything about the other things that I was having like sweets and doughnuts.


Consumption of fizzy drinks is associated with a number of negative health effects, many of which have nothing to do with body weight, such as dental issues. That doesn't mean you should never have them, but in terms of your teeth it would be better to be mindful of how much you consume.

From the perspective of the eating disorder service, if you are drinking "low calorie" or "zero calorie" fizzy drinks rather than something "high in calories", then it sort of defeats the object of it all. Ultimately they are trying to help you to improve your relationship with food (all foods and drinks), as well as your overall health. If you are underweight or facing the consequences of malnutrition, you need to be getting more energy and more nutrients into your body.

Milk is a pretty good drink. It is a source of protein, calcium (needed for bone health), and a bunch of other nutrients. Your body needs energy to function. It also needs fats e.g. for protecting your organs, keeping you warm, making hormones, and forming part of cell walls.
Many people find flavoured milks more appetising than plain milk I, for example, dislike the taste of plain cow milk, but a litre of chocolate milk will not last very long in my fridge :tongue:. It's also the post-workout beverage of choice for many athletes a refreshing mix of hydration, carbohydrates and protein so it's clearly some good stuff :smile:.

Nothing wrong with eating sweets and doughnuts (in moderation). Carbohydrates/sugar = energy = more energy to live a fabulous life! And they taste good, which makes you happy :smile:
(edited 4 months ago)

Quick Reply