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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Just get a student loan.


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    For a lot of people, student loan doesn't even cover accommodation costs
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Once you're at uni you don't have to go home-work full time over the holidays and make sure your housing contract for 2nd and subsequent years starts as soon as your previous contract ends so you can easily move your stuff directly between your houses. This, on top of an interest free overdraft can help you remain independent from your parents.

    I know this may sound harsh, but it sounds like your parents are very toxic, and imho it would be best if you go complete no contact once you start uni, so you can be happy.
    Yeah I know. The thing is the uni I'm hoping to apply to is so expensive with its accomo but I love the uni so much. I think if I apply as an estranged I'll get enough to cover the costs.

    They really are tbh.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Yeah I know. The thing is the uni I'm hoping to apply to is so expensive with its accomo but I love the uni so much. I think if I apply as an estranged I'll get enough to cover the costs.

    They really are tbh.
    Which uni are you hoping to study at? Private housing after first year is usually cheaper, so it'll only be for one year
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    Which uni are you hoping to study at? Private housing after first year is usually cheaper, so it'll only be for one year
    Ideally, if I get the grades for it in the summer (I am praying I do and am so nervous over it) I'm hoping to go for Bristol as my firm and Nottingham as my backup but I'll have to see. I honestly do hope I get the grades to be predicted AAA or something.
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    Don't shoot me down for this but what I have found is people with parents who have higher incomes tend to support their children less financially. Whereas, low income parents try to do as much as they can for their children where they can financially respected.

    For example, children with higher income parents get lower loan and grant etc because the parents are expected to help them out etc when always that isn't the case. Me and my sister get the highest grant and loan available, our parents still help us out here and there. They have NEVER refused to help us when it's needed. I do think it's sad.

    When I have children, I will support them financially to the best of my ability and give them whatever they need. No this doesn't mean expensive gadgets etc, just basic necessities as finacial support, food and shelter etc.

    It's sad to see people who have high income not wanting to help their own children, even though they have the money to do so.

    By the way, I'm talking from personal experience. I hope all parents aren't like this.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    It means you can get a job, which, coupled with a maintenance loan, would provide sufficient income to support you.
    You can get a job from the age of 16, probably even younger.
    Some people get the lowest amount of maintenance which often means that they wouldn't be able to support themselves even with a part time job
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    (Original post by sameehaiqbal)
    Lucky I live in Scotland so I don't have to pay for anything financially towards university tuitions, however, my mum doesnt like the degree course that I want to do at all as she wanted me to do a course that I didn't really see myself doing. It can be quite hard because I just want her to be happy but I don't think she wont be. However, I'm doing this degree for myself and nobody else, as much as I want my mum to be happy I have to think about my own happiness too. It sucks.
    Omg I'm in the exact same position. My mum wants me to pursue a career in medicine or some other science degree whereas i want to do history. So i know they won't finance me and i really don't know what to do.
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    (Original post by NimcoA)
    Omg I'm in the exact same position. My mum wants me to pursue a career in medicine or some other science degree whereas i want to do history. So i know they won't finance me and i really don't know what to do.
    Get the biggest overdraft you can and work full time over holidays and part time over your course so you can fund your own maintenance for a history degree.

    If you have no desire to study medicine it'll just be a waste of everyone's time and money as you'll not do any work and will only get kicked out for failing the course as a result.
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    I'm on both sides of the fence,

    One one hand I get barely any loan and can just cover my rent (with £22 to last me for three months) but my parents do help me and support me whereever they can even though I work as well.

    I do think they should take tax into account. Like yeah my dad earns 45k but he only brings home around 35k ish. I should be assessed on the number that he brings home rather than the amount he earns on paper. Because all that tax is money that lowers how much I get...yet he can't use it to help me..
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    You can get a job from the age of 16, probably even younger.
    Some people get the lowest amount of maintenance which often means that they wouldn't be able to support themselves even with a part time job
    Yes, but at age 18 they have to pay you the minimum wage for adults. And I know several people who have supported themselves on the minimum maintenance loan and no part time job, actually.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    Yes, but at age 18 they have to pay you the minimum wage for adults. And I know several people who have supported themselves on the minimum maintenance loan and no part time job, actually.

    That's a £100 a week over 9 months to live. Hmm. Considering rent is much higher I wouldn't bet on it. Even shared accommodation that's the cheapest at £70 a week won't allow you to do anything
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    (Original post by 97Y)
    This wasn't meant to be a forum for people to give financial advice, but the rest, yes! It's either both or one of them, if she can't support you financially then that's that but then if there is no emotional support. That's where it gets hard..
    I got my first year results and she spent a good few minutes down the phone ranting at me because 'I've got a crap degree from a crap uni and it's a waste of time me doing a degree' (even in Chemistry)
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    Yes, but at age 18 they have to pay you the minimum wage for adults. And I know several people who have supported themselves on the minimum maintenance loan and no part time job, actually.
    Minimum wage isn't anything to shout about, it's very poor, especially if you're only working part time.
    And really? Their accomodation must cost peanuts. Either that or they're eating very little
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    I got my first year results and she spent a good few minutes down the phone ranting at me because 'I've got a crap degree from a crap uni and it's a waste of time me doing a degree' (even in Chemistry)
    Angry Redhead - we meet again! You're doing a degree in chemistry and she says that it's a waste of time..? Riiiiight
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    [QUOTE=Acsel;66714062]Most definitely. I see people complain that they can't afford to go to University and have to question why. Yes there are some people with extenuating circumstances. But the majority of people can go out, get a job and earn the money themselves. University isn't designed to be too expensive and turn the majority away.

    Or I see people attend and then complain when they run out of money. Whose fault is that? If you can't afford it, don't go. Don't just attend university and hope it'll work out. Because that mentality won't work when you've got rent and other bills to pay, food to buy and so on.

    If your parents want to help you out that's great. But don't go in with the assumption they will. For most people university is the first time they'll be acting as adults and living away from home. You won't expect your parents to bail you out every 5 minutes when your 30 so why expect it at 18?[/QUOTE]

    Simply because when you're 30 you're more prepared for life - i.e have a lot more money, have a car, have a job, and maybe a flat or house-share. At 30, you are more financially dependent than when you're 18.

    18 is hardly the moment where you say "you're an adult, so now you have to do things on your own." - 30 is where you have an extra 12 years of life experience...
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    (Original post by AlphaCenturion)
    I don't give a damn if your parents are supportive or not. What I'm saying is, you should all think twice before plunging yourselves into high levels of debt, roughly £50,000 on average. And for what? A degree, something that doesn't guarantee a job. What if something goes wrong during your studies? You're screwed. If you don't get a 1 or atleast a 2:1 then forget about it. To much risk for not enough reward. And if your parents can't help you, grow up. It's their choice to do what they want with their own money. I'm sure they would rather use their money for something they want, rather then paying for their child to drink, party and shag for several years, probably to only come back home afterwards anyway.
    Ridiculious - to not be stuck in a dead-end job, you need a degree; especially in professions such as medicine, teaching, government, business, etc.

    I wouldn't be able to become a teacher or join the publishing industry without a degree in English. This is the same for many people who go and get degrees. I've met only a small handful of people who go to uni just for the hell of it; to drink party and live the hedonistic lifestyle. Some may go not knowing what they are going for other than I loved their subject at A-level, and wish to continue to progress at higher education. There's nothing wrong with that.

    You sound so bitter, it's nauseating.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    I would be too embarrassed to ask my family for money. I'm hoping to get a part-time job.
    I'm like that.

    But our pride can be our downfall.

    There is no shame for asking for help though. I learned that the hard way. If you're in any trouble; economical or health-wise, ask for help. It is better to struggle to keep afloat than to drown sweetheart.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    The thing I'm most worried about is having to go back to them if I'm dangerously poor or something. But I don't think that'll happen if I'm strict with my money. I can't tell you how hard it is being a teenager and not being allowed to be a normal one. I've missed out on so many years of my life so hopefully at uni I'll make up for it.
    It's very, like very difficult to support yourself financially if you have little to no support e.g. family or a job.

    Uni is the time when 18-24 are most socially active; they will go out and spend money on food, nights out, cinema, etc etc. It's a social institution where you need to have money.

    It also get's a lot harder if you wish to look for a house because some of the deposits could take a huge chunk out of your wallet if you have no way of supplementing that money back.

    If you can budget right, then you'll be OK. But it will be very difficult, especially if you want to join societies that often go out for their meetings and so forth.

    I would say think very carefully and try, try very hard to get a job because i've been in financial difficulty (I have a supportive parent [we're just estranged]) and it was horrendous feeling whilst you have got to worry about studying, friendships, living, flatmates, etc. It gets very heavy and no matter what age you are, life does not prepare you for debt (that you can't pay back when the collectors come knocking). I also advise NOT to take out a student bank loan if you can't pay it back within 12 months.
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    (Original post by 97Y)
    Falling out over money.. Do it every week and it's Hell, makes me very bitter. I suppose it's worse if you know that they can but simply won't
    That's awful Can I ask what's their reasoning for not giving a penny to find your studies?
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    (Original post by 97Y)
    That's a £100 a week over 9 months to live. Hmm. Considering rent is much higher I wouldn't bet on it. Even shared accommodation that's the cheapest at £70 a week won't allow you to do anything
    Exactly. My uni rent was £125 a week and my house this Sept is a 12 month contract for £104 a week, excluding bills.

    I had money just about enough. But because I needed to put a deposit down on my house in Jan, it would have left me in the minus. So I had to ask for financial aid from my uni.
    However, £70 is pretty doable in my own experience. I've never had to spend that much unless I would be visiting friends or travelling home (on top of weekly shops and things).

    Don't even get me started on course book materials if you do something like English, Law or Medicine! Uni text books are horrendously expensive.

    PS: Sorry if I'm hijacking your thread!
 
 
 
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