Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by navarre)
    Describing a graph is stupid. It goes up, then down. A child could do it. If AQA wants future scientists, they could go about it in a less patronizing, more relevant manner.
    They have to have questions directed at D students, and questions directed at A/A* students... hence the difference in the difficult of questions in, well, every paper in every subject.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Besides, HSW is not meant to be something that's "taught"... although it kind of is atm- I guess if it wasn't even more people would fail bio and AQA would look bad.
    That is the kind of attitude that annoys me, and the kind people often taken with regard to the UKCAT.
    All the examples in the textbook are application, and the method is meant to be taught. There is a difficulty in teaching the method, as it involves so many components. That, however, is not an excuse to forgo it completely and tab it down to "general intellect".
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SteveCrain)
    That is the kind of attitude that annoys me, and the kind people often taken with regard to the UKCAT.
    All the examples in the textbook are application, and the method is meant to be taught. There is a difficulty in teaching the method, as it involves so many components. That, however, is not an excuse to forgo it completely and tab it down to "general intellect".
    By "taught" I was thinking more along the lines of key words and how there is a specific answer that will get you marks (e.g. correlation doesn't imply causation, named other cause, not total correlation according to graph blah blah). When it gets to that point it's back to recall rather than HSW, and that doesn't differentiate between candidates at all.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oHellno)
    Oh btw guys, I know this is the first year where AS grades are being cashed in, but I don't actually know what that means or what difference it makes. Could someone please enlighten me?

    And good luck with exams, hope everything is going well
    Cashed in means that unis can see your AS grades. It means that can see that you're on target for getting your predicted grades, rather than just seeing your predicted A2 grades and not knowing whether or not your teacher was being overambitious.

    Some say it'll give you an advantage if you cash your AS grades in, uni websites don't mention it and the processes that unis use to pick interviewees don't mention ASs either. :iiam:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    so glad i found this thread! anyone thinking of applying to Edinburgh?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    Cashed in means that unis can see your AS grades. It means that can see that you're on target for getting your predicted grades, rather than just seeing your predicted A2 grades and not knowing whether or not your teacher was being overambitious.

    Some say it'll give you an advantage if you cash your AS grades in, uni websites don't mention it and the processes that unis use to pick interviewees don't mention ASs either. :iiam:
    Oh. I thought they could always see your AS grades. I hope it doesn't make too much a difference.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by oHellno)
    Oh. I thought they could always see your AS grades. I hope it doesn't make too much a difference.
    There are loads of stories of people getting offers with below aaa(b) AS grades so yeah it can't be that much of a hindrance. :dontknow:
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by cute_wish)
    Does it matter which uni a person graduates from?
    Nope. A medical graduate's a medical graduate.

    (Original post by kirstykk)
    so glad i found this thread! anyone thinking of applying to Edinburgh?
    Yep! It's my favourite city in the UK and the course looks great, so first choice I think
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Unbiased Opinion)
    They have to have questions directed at D students, and questions directed at A/A* students... hence the difference in the difficult of questions in, well, every paper in every subject.
    Oh, I see. So now it's got nothing to do with 'scientists of the future' nonsense, but less able candidates.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by navarre)
    Oh, I see. So now it's got nothing to do with 'scientists of the future' nonsense, but less able candidates.
    It's not nonsense... think about it. People pick for A Level what they want to do... by the time this gets to A2 people only have 3 subjects, which means the chances of them going on to do a degree in their A Level subjects is pretty high. Picking Biology means you have a 1/3 ish chance of going on to do a biology related degree.

    And yeah, an exam board has to take into consideration all abilities... hence why you get questions which involve only "describing", and questions which involve explanation and stretch and challenge ones. They can't exactly only address the people who will go on to be scientists....
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by navarre)
    Oh, I see. So now it's got nothing to do with 'scientists of the future' nonsense, but less able candidates.
    I'm not gonna lie, I hate HSW questions, and I so think AQA uses it a bit too much but I can also see why they use it. It's a lot easier to memorise textbooks and remember key words for a straightforward question, especially for Biology. It's a mixture of what Unbiased said, it lets them differentiate between students who are simply good at memorising a textbook and those who actually have an understanding and can put their knowledge to use.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stegosaurus)
    Salters is the 'B' Specification for chemistry on the OCR exam board.

    Supposedly it's better than other chemistry specs because it has a 'context-led' approach where you, for instance, learn all the chemistry that's involved in global warming and ozone depletion, rather than learning about bond vibration, homolytic fission etc. as discreet concepts.
    Is it more hard work than other specs then?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by itsrayray:))
    OCR Salters is like a branch of the exam board OCR....I think
    Yeah I just read it is OCR B so your right.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fluffy Chuckie)
    Is it more hard work than other specs then?
    I've never known anything different, so I can't really comment
    I know my school uses OCR over AQA for chemistry to avoid the horrendously specific marking scheme like we have in biology, but I don't know why we use OCR B over OCR A.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    What universities are people thinking of applying to? (and why/how did you pick the ones you are thinking of?)
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by giraffegiraffe)
    What universities are people thinking of applying to? (and why/how did you pick the ones you are thinking of?)
    I will buy everyone who applies to Aberdeen a drink.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    I will buy everyone who applies to Aberdeen a drink.
    Are you secretly on the take from Aberdeen's student recruitment office? :P
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Stegosaurus)
    Are you secretly on the take from Aberdeen's student recruitment office? :P
    Secretly?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    what minimum final AS grades do you need, to get a chance of an interview?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Secretly?
    What's the teaching style like at Aberdeen?
    "...a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, practical anatomy and clinical sessions and small group Community Course session..." sounds rather appealing.
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: December 14, 2011
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.