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    I was at a student house yesterday, and it was a complete tip. Mess everywhere on the floor, the bin was overflowing and rubbish was being purposely put around it, the bathroom was dirty, the kitchen was filthy was washing up and old food everywhere, the bedroom I went in had laundry everywhere and pizza boxes and beer bottles strewn across the floor, everywhere needed hoovering and parts of the house were damp.

    Why do students choose to live like this? Do they want to get sick and/or live in chaos and mess? I'm 16 but I couldn't live like that at ll; if something needs cleaning or doing no matter how big or small, I just get on and do it. It disgusts me how people live everyday like this; I was told seven people live in that house, I don't see how none of them can be bothered to look after where they live.
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    A lot of people aren't used to having to clean up after themselves. It's a big transition going from living with your parents to being somewhat independent. Even those who feel they do a lot around the house probably don't realise quite how much it is that their parents do for them. Stocking the things needed to keep a place clean is also quite pricey when you're living on a budget - especially if not everyone is chipping in. And if you leave them out in the common area expect things to vanish so rapidly you wonder why it was even worth paying for it in the first place.

    I lived in halls at 18-19 and then again at 22-23. In the latter I ended up doing most of the cleaning in the communal areas because I just couldn't stand the smell or the sight of the place. I tried ignoring it a few times when I got fed-up cleaning up after everyone else but it just became unbearable as no one else was willing to pick up the slack. I stayed more weekends than anyone else so I was just making myself suffer by doing that anyway.
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    People that rely on their parents to do everything tend to do this.
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    (Original post by sinfonietta)
    A lot of people aren't used to having to clean up after themselves. It's a big transition going from living with your parents to being somewhat independent. Even those who feel they do a lot around the house probably don't realise quite how much it is that their parents do for them. Stocking the things needed to keep a place clean is also quite pricey when you're living on a budget - especially if not everyone is chipping in. And if you leave them out in the common area expect things to vanish so rapidly you wonder why it was even worth paying for it in the first place.

    I lived in halls at 18-19 and then again at 22-23. In the latter I ended up doing most of the cleaning in the communal areas because I just couldn't stand the smell or the sight of the place. I tried ignoring it a few times when I got fed-up cleaning up after everyone else but it just became unbearable as no one else was willing to pick up the slack. I stayed more weekends than anyone else so I was just making myself suffer by doing that anyway.
    I see what you're saying, but I still don't understand how just seeing the mess everyday doesn't hit people's minds, and they don't think they should do something about it. II don't see why people wouldn't just buy their own cleaning stuff if they don't want to rely on other people's money; Poundland has everything someone on a budget would need to keep everything clean.

    It fascinates me how people moan that their house is dirty, person X hasn't taken the bin out and person Y has left their washing in the sink; just do it. Students usually have the time between lectures and socialising to sort out their living conditions.
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    1. Students are often used to their parents doing the cleaning for them, so they can't be bothered.
    2. In a house share, no-one takes responsibility for cleaning. Everyone waits for someone else to do it. And if you do do it, you will probably get fed up of having to always do it while your housemates don't bother.
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    Got bigger things to worry about.
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    (Original post by Yaboi)
    Got bigger things to worry about.
    Like what? Being late to your media studies lecture or arranging a time to go the pub? I don't see how people don't have time to live cleanly.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Like what? Being late to your media studies lecture or arranging a time to go the pub? I don't see how people don't have time to live cleanly.
    People are stressed out with work, revision, yes classes, prepping meals, doing washing etc

    yh it might seem small but going from having everything given to you to such a life is very hard. If having a messy room is the biggest issue you have as a student then you're doing pretty good imo.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    ...I don't see why people wouldn't just buy their own cleaning stuff if they don't want to rely on other people's money...
    It's kind of the opposite. People want their flatmates to buy the cleaning products so they don't have to spend their own money on it. And when they run out people just wait for someone else to cave and go buy more.

    It's why I hoarded mine in my room.
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    Like others have said it's because they have no idea how to live. They never did things at home and their parents spoilt them. They didn't learn basic life skills.

    When you get used to something, you keep doing it. It's no intentional, it just doesn't register. For example, students that are used to living in a messy environment or dumping dishes for parents to clean will naturally do this when living by themselves. I live with 3 other students in halls, 1 of them can do the bare minimum but the other 2 do not clean, wash up, take bins out and can't cook. How do I deal with that? I don't, they're not my problem. If there's a mess I deal with the bare minimum for me to be content. But since the only shared space is our kitchen it's not an issue. If they leave it in a mess then I don't touch it. I get my stuff and leave. If they don't wash up then I ignore it. Not my problem. Will they learn? Probably not. Also not my problem.

    Anything that is my responsibility is kept clean. So my room and bathroom. Anything else I do my share but no more. Yes, a lot of students are spoilt slobs who can't fend for themselves which sucks for the rest of us. Going into halls was the biggest mistake I made at university. Unless you have absolute control over who you are staying with I don't recommend halls if things like this bother you. Keep in mind that it doesn't stop there. I for example will wake up at 7am and go to bed at 11pm. It's a miracle if anyone in my flat is awake before noon but there's a good chance they'll make a lot of noise at 2am. All that mess, the beer bottles and so on probably came from a drunk party in the early hours of the morning. Not fun when it's 2 feet from your head and you're trying to sleep. Students are awful
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Like others have said it's because they have no idea how to live. They never did things at home and their parents spoilt them. They didn't learn basic life skills.

    When you get used to something, you keep doing it. It's no intentional, it just doesn't register. For example, students that are used to living in a messy environment or dumping dishes for parents to clean will naturally do this when living by themselves. I live with 3 other students in halls, 1 of them can do the bare minimum but the other 2 do not clean, wash up, take bins out and can't cook. How do I deal with that? I don't, they're not my problem. If there's a mess I deal with the bare minimum for me to be content. But since the only shared space is our kitchen it's not an issue. If they leave it in a mess then I don't touch it. I get my stuff and leave. If they don't wash up then I ignore it. Not my problem. Will they learn? Probably not. Also not my problem.

    Anything that is my responsibility is kept clean. So my room and bathroom. Anything else I do my share but no more. Yes, a lot of students are spoilt slobs who can't fend for themselves which sucks for the rest of us. Going into halls was the biggest mistake I made at university. Unless you have absolute control over who you are staying with I don't recommend halls if things like this bother you. Keep in mind that it doesn't stop there. I for example will wake up at 7am and go to bed at 11pm. It's a miracle if anyone in my flat is awake before noon but there's a good chance they'll make a lot of noise at 2am. All that mess, the beer bottles and so on probably came from a drunk party in the early hours of the morning. Not fun when it's 2 feet from your head and you're trying to sleep. Students are awful
    Are most people in halls like this then? If they are I think I'm just going to live on my own (I can afford to), as I don't think I could stand living in fear of mess and noise. Just before students went university I had assumed their parents would give them a crash course in how to keep a house/flat clean and how to do basic life jobs, like washing and vacuuming.

    Do you not get freaked out if you have to prepare meals and have your stuff in a messy kitchen, when it's still dirty from other people's stuff? I know I would; even when my own stuff was clean and put away I'd be paranoid about contamination from the air and physical things around me.
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    Most people aren't as bad as that, obviously, but it's mostly because we've got more important stuff to do, or we've got so much more important stuff to do that we need a break and can't afford the time. When you're working 10-5 or sometimes 9-12 or 9-4 when **** hits the fan for 7 days a week for 2 months straight you don't really prioritise washing dishes.

    As for the overflowing bins they might not have a choice, it's pretty easy for stuff to pile up if you miss a collection and it's pretty easy to miss a collection over the holidays because you can't really put your bin out or you'll get fined for leaving it on the pavement for a couple weeks.
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    Mummy is not there to clean up the mess.
    Weed
    Lack of responsibility
    Rooms or flat in a poor condition to begin with
    Impact of Thatcher and Blair and me-me-me
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    because most dont have their independance.
    i had mine at 15 thankfully
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Most people aren't as bad as that, obviously, but it's mostly because we've got more important stuff to do, or we've got so much more important stuff to do that we need a break and can't afford the time. When you're working 10-5 or sometimes 9-12 or 9-4 when **** hits the fan for 7 days a week for 2 months straight you don't really prioritise washing dishes.

    As for the overflowing bins they might not have a choice, it's pretty easy for stuff to pile up if you miss a collection and it's pretty easy to miss a collection over the holidays because you can't really put your bin out or you'll get fined for leaving it on the pavement for a couple weeks.
    There is always time to do the dishes. My sister who's a nurse works 07:30-20:00 four to five days a week has a spotless house with clean dishes, etc. How can you wake up and think you don't have two minutes to take a bin out or wash a cup, or fifteen minutes after work to wash-up stuff you've left in the sink? How do you physically live with dirty stuff, or stuff you can't use?

    If you miss a collection take it to the tip yourself. If you're working then part of having a healthy and productive work life is to have a decent, clean home life. I wouldn't want to come home to a house overflowing with dirt and mess; I'd rather stay at work.
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    It's reading stuff like this that makes me glad that my parents gave me chores to do growing up. I know people who are going to university and they don't even know how to put the washing on.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Are most people in halls like this then? If they are I think I'm just going to live on my own (I can afford to), as I don't think I could stand living in fear of mess and noise. Just before students went university I had assumed their parents would give them a crash course in how to keep a house/flat clean and how to do basic life jobs, like washing and vacuuming.

    Do you not get freaked out if you have to prepare meals and have your stuff in a messy kitchen, when it's still dirty from other people's stuff? I know I would; even when my own stuff was clean and put away I'd be paranoid about contamination from the air and physical things around me.
    In halls there is usually a cleaner, so it won't be a bad as a house, but there will be certain things that they won't do, such as taking out bins and washing dishes so it still will be messier than living with your parents.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    Are most people in halls like this then? If they are I think I'm just going to live on my own (I can afford to), as I don't think I could stand living in fear of mess and noise. Just before students went university I had assumed their parents would give them a crash course in how to keep a house/flat clean and how to do basic life jobs, like washing and vacuuming.

    Do you not get freaked out if you have to prepare meals and have your stuff in a messy kitchen, when it's still dirty from other people's stuff? I know I would; even when my own stuff was clean and put away I'd be paranoid about contamination from the air and physical things around me.
    It varies and I think the severity depends on how much you actually get annoyed by it. I know people that would say they don't have any issue but if I saw their flats I'd think it were attrocious.

    I'm not super paranoid about the mess, I sort of accept that you aren't going to keep everything clean. Even if everyone were tidy odds are there's still going to be a lot of germs. I have no concerns about contamination and what not, I wipe surfaces down before using them, keep my stuff clean, chop on my own cutting board and so on. It's fairly regular for me to come in, find the flat covered in bottles, alochol spilled everywhere etc. I always make sure that's tidy and clean before doing anything. I'm not paranoid about contamination from the air or anything, that would be taking it too far. I'm sure normal city air is just as bad for you. I don't think it benfits you to be super clean either, that's the sort of thing that causes bacteria to become immune. I feel like my health is better for not living in a 100% clean environment.

    For reference this sort of thing is pretty normal here. Someone does usually tidy it up the day after but I'll just grab my cereal and leave it alone.

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    In terms of other students, one of my friends is staying with 5 other people, he thought they'd been taking bins out when some of them had actually just been throwing the bags into a cupboard. You can imagine how bad that was after a few days

    I can count on one hand the number of times my flatmates have taken our bin out since moving in. Comparatively I take it 2 or 3 times a week

    I have personally thrown away a flatmates bowl that was left in the fridge with cheese that had gone very much off

    Not a cleanliness issue but one of my friends has moved twice now due to poor flamates/neighbours. Not sure what happened the first time, second time he was in a flat by himself but the 12 neighbours in the 2 flats next door were overly disruptive.

    My personal experience is that students aren't perfect. I'm not going to condone everyone, I'm sure a lot (maybe even most) of them are fine to live with. But if you have no control over who you stay with them you risk getting put with the worst people. Given the choice again I would have rented privately, either in a shared house where I made the choices on who to stay with or by myself.

    What is important to remember though is that while you are annoyed by so much mess, your flatmates will be equally annoyed by how much of a "clean freak" you are. The issue is not so much tha they are dirty, the issue is with the difference in personality. If you don't fit the stereotypical student (drinks, leaves some mess, etc.) then odds are you're going to end up with people who you won't get alone with. Ignoring the mess issues, the fact that I don't drink and like to go to sleep before midnight has left me hating my flatmates. There's nothing wrong with them drinking and staying up until 2am but I was unfortunate enough to get a room by the kitchen, right where they make noise. They are disruptive because of a difference in personalities, not because they are explictly wrong. Leaving mess is of course wrong but odds are you're not going to have a similar point of view to other students. Because you have no control I recommend not going into halls, purely to save yourself hassle.
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    (Original post by Glassapple)
    There is always time to do the dishes. My sister who's a nurse works 07:30-20:00 four to five days a week has a spotless house with clean dishes, etc. How can you wake up and think you don't have two minutes to take a bin out or wash a cup, or fifteen minutes after work to wash-up stuff you've left in the sink? How do you physically live with dirty stuff, or stuff you can't use?

    If you miss a collection take it to the tip yourself. If you're working then part of having a healthy and productive work life is to have a decent, clean home life. I wouldn't want to come home to a house overflowing with dirt and mess; I'd rather stay at work.
    Ooh your sister has a weekend, lucky her, that actually gives her a couple days when she doesn't have work to do so no it's not really more difficult for her to prioritise as such. Additionally it's a lot easier to clean up for yourself when there's one or two of you than when there's 5 or so of you, and if she's out 7.30-20.00 she's pretty unlikely to make any mess anyway.

    It's pretty easy to think that way, you get up as late as you can, or as late as you can while giving yourself time to make sure you're not rushed and then you just don't have the time to do anything extra in the morning or it screws up your schedule. Equally if you're just getting back from work you're not going to be in the mood to spend 15 minutes doing more work. You clean stuff as you need it or when you have a rare moment where you can spare the time to do a clean.

    Taking a collection to the tip requires a car and money, it costs quite a bit to drop something off at the tip. Both are things that most students don't really have.

    You're coming from the point of view of someone who has only been at school and has had other people in the house who are more responsible for keeping it clean. Once you experience the life of a university student which quickly becomes very 24/7 and comes with the variety that living with other people does you'll quickly realise that keeping your house spotless starts to drop on the priority list.
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    (Original post by Acsel)

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    To me, this is absolutely fine.

    This just looks like a bunch of people have had pre-s and then gone out. Very unlikely that they're going to clear up before they go, but when they get round to it, it looks like less than 5 minutes work to chuck everything out (except that last Koppaberg and the 2 fingers of JD) and wipe up the work top. Nothing looks dirty really - there's just a lot of detritus.
 
 
 
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