SRazaq
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I’ve heard that doing a foundation year for accounting and finance isn’t great and I was wondering if by doing a foundation year I’ve put myself at a disadvantage in terms of my employability in the future. Would it be better if I take a gap year and redo my A Levels or just do the foundation year?
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username3634736
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Hello

I took a foundation course and I'm so glad that I did this. Employers will love this as you've actually done a 4-year degree showing that you are dedicated and have a positive attitude.

You get to learn all the core subjects briefly but will prepare you for your degree. You will learn about plagiarism, TurnItIn system, get to know the library system, meet new friends, prepare presentations, reference, maths skills, etc etc.

So when you go into your first year you'll know everything and those poor students coming in for their first year will not. You'll have the advantage.

Whatever you decide I wish you all the best. Personally, for me, I feel so much more confident and so glad that I did a foundation.

Kind regards
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SRazaq
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(Original post by alisonphelan)
Hello

I took a foundation course and I'm so glad that I did this. Employers will love this as you've actually done a 4-year degree showing that you are dedicated and have a positive attitude.

You get to learn all the core subjects briefly but will prepare you for your degree. You will learn about plagiarism, TurnItIn system, get to know the library system, meet new friends, prepare presentations, reference, maths skills, etc etc.

So when you go into your first year you'll know everything and those poor students coming in for their first year will not. You'll have the advantage.

Whatever you decide I wish you all the best. Personally, for me, I feel so much more confident and so glad that I did a foundation.

Kind regards
Hiiii

Thank you sooo much for the reply!! If I missed the entry requirements by one grade would you say the foundation year is still worth doing over resitting the a level?

Kind regards
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username3634736
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Yes definitely and good luck x
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harrysbar
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(Original post by SRazaq)
Hiiii

Thank you sooo much for the reply!! If I missed the entry requirements by one grade would you say the foundation year is still worth doing over resitting the a level?

Kind regards
If you missed the entry requirements by only one grade, it's a shame the uni didn't let you in anyway but made you do the extra year. For people who have poor A levels, they are often better off resitting them rather than doing the foundation year, but if your A levels are decent and you really wanted to go to that particular uni, maybe it was a good option
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username3634736
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(Original post by harrysbar)
If you missed the entry requirements by only one grade, it's a shame the uni didn't let you in anyway but made you do the extra year. For people who have poor A levels, they are often better off resitting them rather than doing the foundation year, but if your A levels are decent and you really wanted to go to that particular uni, maybe it was a good option
Hi I totally agree with harrysbar, I would give the uni a call (clearing dept) or you could do a search on the uni website and it will flag up if it has places - if the course is not full they may let you on.

good luck

good luck
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OR321
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If it’s only one grade then I would call them or resit. Otherwise if it was a couple of grades than stay with foundation
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suzui
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(Original post by alisonphelan)
Hello

I took a foundation course and I'm so glad that I did this. Employers will love this as you've actually done a 4-year degree showing that you are dedicated and have a positive attitude.

You get to learn all the core subjects briefly but will prepare you for your degree. You will learn about plagiarism, TurnItIn system, get to know the library system, meet new friends, prepare presentations, reference, maths skills, etc etc.

So when you go into your first year you'll know everything and those poor students coming in for their first year will not. You'll have the advantage.

Whatever you decide I wish you all the best. Personally, for me, I feel so much more confident and so glad that I did a foundation.

Kind regards
I’m guessing that the foundation year is considered as a part of the degree, as you mentioned the employers liked that you did a 4 year degree. Is it the same for all degrees, like law? Just wanted to ask.
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Hi yes it is and it also gives you an insight into the course. Also, I started a forensic scientist course as foundation and then changed to a human biology degree as I felt it was more suited to me that way you don’t have to undertake your first year again. It does have lots of benefits undertaking a foundation year and your first year will be going over what you learnt in foundation but in more detail so you’ve a massive head start. You’ll know how to reference, write essays the way a university requires and during your break in the summer which is very long I knew what books to read in preparation for my first year hopefully making it more understandable to me as I’m a mature student

You’ll smash it and enjoy University

Ally x
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username3634736
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If you can just get onto the degree instead of doing a foundation then you should if you can saved you a lot of money that’s why I said call the uni I do know lots of students are getting places with just under points. You need to speak to the academic of that course

Kind regards
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PQ
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I’ve never known an employer to consider a degree with foundation year as superior just because it’s an extra year. Employers aren’t interested in how long you attend university.
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suzui
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(Original post by alisonphelan)
If you can just get onto the degree instead of doing a foundation then you should if you can saved you a lot of money that’s why I said call the uni I do know lots of students are getting places with just under points. You need to speak to the academic of that course

Kind regards
I don’t know if this was for me, and I forgot to mention Im an international student. it’s kind of important that I do a 4 year degree, I’ve been told that it looked better for some reason. I applied for university of Durham International Foundation year and they just reached me said that I was eligible for it.
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That’s great well done x
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returnmigrant
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(Original post by suzui)
I don’t know if this was for me, and I forgot to mention Im an international student. it’s kind of important that I do a 4 year degree, I’ve been told that it looked better for some reason. I applied for university of Durham International Foundation year and they just reached me said that I was eligible for it.
Doing a Foundation degree at a 'good' Uni is a better idea than retaking A levels - especially if you are an Overseas student. You get an intro to UK study, and you are effectively guaranteed a place at that Uni for your degree - and for a place at Durham this is def. worth having. You leave with 'a degree' - it wont mention on your degree certificate that you did a Foundation year initially.

(The only issue with Foundation degrees generally is that often they can tie you in to only doing the rest of that degree at that (and only that) Uni. A year at a 'lower' Uni therefore may mean you can only do your degree there because no 'higher' Uni will accept that Foundation degree. In that situation, its better to retake A levels.)
Last edited by returnmigrant; 1 month ago
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PQ
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(Original post by returnmigrant)
Doing a Foundation degree at a 'good' Uni is a better idea than retaking A levels - especially if you are an Overseas student. You get an intro to UK study, and you are effectively guaranteed a place at that Uni for your degree - and for a place at Durham this is def. worth having. You leave with 'a degree' - it wont mention on your degree certificate that you did a Foundation year initially.

(The only issue with Foundation degrees generally is that often they can tie you in to only doing the rest of that degree at that (and only that) Uni. A year at a 'lower' Uni therefore may mean you can only do your degree there because no 'higher' Uni will accept that Foundation degree. In that situation, its better to retake A levels.)
I'd argue that paying £19,250 plus UK living costs for one year at Durham is not worth it for someone who could resit their A levels at home for a much lower cost. Unless the university has a specific policy/disadvantages resit A level applicants then resitting A levels will always be a more economical choice
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(Original post by PQ)
I'd argue that paying £19,250 plus UK living costs for one year at Durham is not worth it for someone who could resit their A levels at home for a much lower cost. Unless the university has a specific policy/disadvantages resit A level applicants then resitting A levels will always be a more economical choice
I'm sorry, but having read through this thread there's so much acrimony against universities that are not "highly rated". OK Cambridge and Oxford yes I agree, but do you actually know how the statistics are referenced. It's a piece of paper (questionnaire) every university gives out to their students some universities even hold lectures so that each student fills it in others just don't do this. Please individual classism is not very attractive and it's not very kind on the students and lecturers that work at these universities. It's entirely up to the individual about which university they choose.
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PQ
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(Original post by alisonphelan)
I'm sorry, but having read through this thread there's so much acrimony against universities that are not "highly rated". OK Cambridge and Oxford yes I agree, but do you actually know how the statistics are referenced. It's a piece of paper (questionnaire) every university gives out to their students some universities even hold lectures so that each student fills it in others just don't do this. Please individual classism is not very attractive and it's not very kind on the students and lecturers that work at these universities. It's entirely up to the individual about which university they choose.
I don't know why you have quoted me. I am stating that almost all foundation years are not in a student's best interest - I haven't said anything about "highly rated" universities (and generally when posters on TSR talk about "highly rated" they're talking about reputation/prestige and not National Student Survey results).
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username3634736
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(Original post by PQ)
I’ve never known an employer to consider a degree with foundation year as superior just because it’s an extra year. Employers aren’t interested in how long you attend university.
I was told that by my tutor and I do feel that it shows more of a commitment to ones studies and I'm all for foundation years I'm so much more prepared going into my first year now hopefully it will boost my final grade which is what employers are interested in
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username3634736
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(Original post by PQ)
I don't know why you have quoted me. I am stating that almost all foundation years are not in a student's best interest - I haven't said anything about "highly rated" universities (and generally when posters on TSR talk about "highly rated" they're talking about reputation/prestige and not National Student Survey results).
I was posting generally didn't mean to post to you apologies - ill get my coat
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