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gross miscounduct

i need your advice for a friend and she doesnt want to lose her job she feels so sad and bad,.
her dad had cancer and she has been taking care of his bills and all,on evil fateful day she was suppose to pay for his treatment but she didnt have any money,so she picked money from the till ,weeks after she was suspended and had to meet with the management and she said the truth that she feel terrible for doing it because of her dad's health and she eventually lost her dad. She will be facing the disciplinary system soon and shes confused. She lost her dad already. She's now an ophan,and she needs the job to sustain herself. What is her hope?Do you think they will give her a second chance or get dismissed?
Reply 1
The prospects are not good. There tends to be zero tolerance of stealing and an expectation that other ways to get some help are followed rather than taking from the till. This said the background, previous good service and corporate culture do weigh in to a decision. The person should get some union or other experienced representation to support them through this process
(edited 3 months ago)
Original post by Anonymous #1
i need your advice for a friend and she doesnt want to lose her job she feels so sad and bad,.
her dad had cancer and she has been taking care of his bills and all,on evil fateful day she was suppose to pay for his treatment but she didnt have any money,so she picked money from the till ,weeks after she was suspended and had to meet with the management and she said the truth that she feel terrible for doing it because of her dad's health and she eventually lost her dad. She will be facing the disciplinary system soon and shes confused. She lost her dad already. She's now an ophan,and she needs the job to sustain herself. What is her hope?Do you think they will give her a second chance or get dismissed?

While your situation was desperate, you can’t have expected to be let off after you stole from the tills and an employer can’t just let that slide, regardless of the reason. I hope you don’t get fired but I think you should prepare for the very real possibility that you’re going to be sacked and maybe you should start job hunting now, even if it’s informally.
Honestly, people get sacked for less. Unless the employer is extraordinarily sympathetic about the circumstances I can’t see your friend staying there.
Original post by Sorcerer of Old
While your situation was desperate, you can’t have expected to be let off after you stole from the tills and an employer can’t just let that slide, regardless of the reason. I hope you don’t get fired but I think you should prepare for the very real possibility that you’re going to be sacked and maybe you should start job hunting now, even if it’s informally.

She’s still on paid suspension but she will be having her disciplinary meeting in days time , she told the truth during the first meeting and plead not to involve the police or humiliated by her colleagues and she was told police won’t be involved but she can’t be promised her job anymore , do you think she should attend the meeting ?
Original post by greatfulheart
She’s still on paid suspension but she will be having her disciplinary meeting in days time , she told the truth during the first meeting and plead not to involve the police or humiliated by her colleagues and she was told police won’t be involved but she can’t be promised her job anymore , do you think she should attend the meeting ?

Of course you should attend the meeting, not attending is likely to just result in automatic dismissal whereas if you attend there’s a small chance you can keep your job.
Reply 6
Original post by Admit-One
Honestly, people get sacked for less. Unless the employer is extraordinarily sympathetic about the circumstances I can’t see your friend staying there.

Do you think she should attend the disciplinary meeting or she should just accept her fate
Reply 7
Original post by Zarek
The prospects are not good. There tends to be zero tolerance of stealing and an expectation that other ways to get some help are followed rather than taking from the till. This said the background, previous good service and corporate culture do weigh in to a decision. The person should get some union or other experienced representation to support them through this process

What if the person doesn’t have any one to go with ? Can the person go alone ? Or not go at all and what effect would it have on the person next job
Reply 8
Original post by Anonymous #1
What if the person doesn’t have any one to go with ? Can the person go alone ? Or not go at all and what effect would it have on the person next job

You can go alone and say your piece. If the workplace has union reps they should be prepared to give some support. There is life after set backs like this. The reason for leaving previous jobs is not always explored in detail, people are given another chance and without a criminal conviction there is nothing really on the record. I know of people that have bounced back from some pretty severe gross misconduct
Original post by Anonymous
Do you think she should attend the disciplinary meeting or she should just accept her fate


I would definitely go. It may be uncomfortable but at least she can explain her case and express regret. As above, I think she’ll be dismissed if she doesn’t attend so it’s worth a shot.

If she does end up getting fired, then employers nowadays often only give a basic reference confirming dates and job title. It won’t necessarily be disclosed how she left.
Reply 10
She should thank her lucky stars she's not getting taken to court for a criminal conviction, which really would mess up her chances of employment. She should definitely go to whatever meeting is being held and take someone with for support if the HR policy says she can. HR will be able to advise if she doesn't know. It's a sucky situation to be in but choices are made and consequences have to be lived with, even when it doesn't seem fair. She could have asked for an advance or gone to someone to borrow the money rather than steal...

:s-smilie:
Reply 11
Original post by Spanx
She should thank her lucky stars she's not getting taken to court for a criminal conviction, which really would mess up her chances of employment. She should definitely go to whatever meeting is being held and take someone with for support if the HR policy says she can. HR will be able to advise if she doesn't know. It's a sucky situation to be in but choices are made and consequences have to be lived with, even when it doesn't seem fair. She could have asked for an advance or gone to someone to borrow the money rather than steal...

:s-smilie:

She’s been dismissed wish her all the best

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