The Student Room Group

feeling bad about spending money at uni

I am pretty good at budgeting (eg shopping at cheaper supermarkets, having a £50 weekly budget I generally stick too, my parents give me money at the start of each semester) especially because I live in an expensive area, however I'm in a mindset where I just.. don't want to spend money?
I pretty much only spend money on necessaries, and I always feel really guilty that I never invite my friends out (all of whom are commuters with jobs) or spend money on things I'd like/need which aren't necessaries (especially clothes). Whenever I run low on food before my weekly shop, I either don't eat or feel guilty that I've just spent me when I probably shouldn't have. When my friends do invite me out, I always awkwardly ask if we can go to the cheapest places available.
I feel really guilty, but it's making me miserable to the point where even if I do buy something I feel like I will regret it. Furthermore I have a reputation for being the worst out of my sisters (both also at uni) with money, so I have a lot less money than them.
Sorry for the rant, but does anyone have any advice?
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by R4spB3rri3s
I am pretty good at budgeting (eg shopping at cheaper supermarkets, having a £50 weekly budget I generally stick too, my parents give me money at the start of each semester) especially because I live in an expensive area, however I'm in a mindset where I just.. don't want to spend money?
I pretty much only spend money on necessaries, and I always feel really guilty that I never invite my friends out (all of whom are commuters with jobs) or spend money on things I'd like/need which aren't necessaries (especially clothes). Whenever I run low on food before my weekly shop, I either don't eat or feel guilty that I've just spent me when I probably shouldn't have. When my friends do invite me out, I always awkwardly ask if we can go to the cheapest places available.
I feel really guilty, but it's making me miserable to the point where even if I do buy something I feel like I will regret it. Furthermore I have a reputation for being the worst out of my sisters (both also at uni) with money, so I have a lot less money than them.
Sorry for the rant, but does anyone have any advice?
Hey,

First off, big props to you for being on top of your budget that's seriously impressive! Living in an expensive area can definitely add some extra challenges, but it sounds like you've got a solid handle on managing your finances.

Now, let's talk about that mindset. Feeling guilty about spending money or not wanting to treat yourself every now and then is a common struggle, but it's important to find a balance. Remember, it's okay to indulge occasionally you've earned it!

When it comes to hanging out with friends, there's no need to feel guilty about suggesting cheaper options. True friends understand and appreciate each other's circumstances, and the time spent together is what truly matters. Plus, there are plenty of fun and budget-friendly activities out there that can make for memorable experiences without breaking the bank.

As for those moments when you run low on food or hesitate to spend, try to be kind to yourself. Your well-being is paramount, so don't hesitate to prioritise your needs, whether it's nourishing your body or treating yourself to something that brings you joy.

Remember, everyone's financial situation is unique, and comparisons can be tricky. Focus on your own journey and the progress you're making, rather than measuring up to others' standards. Lastly, if you're feeling overwhelmed or need some extra support, don't hesitate to reach out to a trusted friend, family member. Talking it out can often bring some clarity and relief.

There always support available at your University. This can be help with food, money, or just someone to talk to. At the University of Salford, we have the AskUS service (https://www.salford.ac.uk/askus/topics/money). This acts as my first point of contact for any help. I suggest looking into the support offered at your university just to see how they might be able to help.

Hang in there, and remember, you're doing a great job. If you ever need a friendly ear or some advice, don't hesitate to reach out.

Cheers,
Arslan University of Salford Student Representative

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