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    Hello,

    I've almost graduated and it's looking likely I'll be getting a 2:2. The problem is that I've had an awful anxiety condition which has taken me many years to overcome. In addition, I was utterly clueless academically when I started. These two factors really held me back for about five years of university (It's taken me six years to complete a three year degree because I deferred three times because of the anxiety). The good news is that I've overcome my anxiety and I've scored three first class essays towards the very end of the degree. What has taken my mark down to a 2:2 is that I never submitted work in the early years and also scored extremely poor marks too.

    My question is this: despite me likely getting a 2:2, I can produce first class work and I'm extremely well-organised and academically capable. Would you employ me knowing this?
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    Its great that you've overcome your anxiety! What did you graduate in? What sort of jobs are you applying for? Have you been invited for any interviews yet?



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    I used to do shortlisting for my dad's business when he was hiring. Assuming your degree was in a relevant subject, I was gonna say yes; I would. However, as you highlighted your anxiety issue I'd be wondering whether you were ready for a graduate job. Also, as my dad has a medium business, it'd be far too expensive if you were to go off on long term sickness for him to maintain profit margins. I'd also be weary of labour turnover - it's expensive to hire someone. (When you consider the cost of advertising, setting aside the time to shortlist and interview, etc). I'd be very mindful of this when considering your application.

    It is useless, in my opinion, that you can produce first class work. Ultimately you're gonna have a 2:2 on paper. If you can demonstrate that you're a well organised individual, as you say, then that'd be a plus. I'd also be curious about what you did in the three years where you deferred. If you have three years of work experience then that would be an advantage to you over someone with a 2:1 or first but no experience.

    On the whole, I would employ you if there were no other candidates with a stronger application. But that's how it goes with every job!

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    (Original post by A321)
    Its great that you've overcome your anxiety! What did you graduate in? What sort of jobs are you applying for? Have you been invited for any interviews yet?



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    Yeah, I'm so happy with overcoming anxiety. I had from about 8 years old and only at 33 have I finally understood my condition and moved on with my life.

    I've graduated in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but I've learnt a hell of a lot about research and organising. I'm guessing research will be my forte from now on. I have so many private projects lined up that involves research.

    And no, I don't have any interviews yet! I've asked a few companies to call me back towards the end of July, so we'll see how these things go.
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Yeah, I'm so happy with overcoming anxiety. I had from about 8 years old and only at 33 have I finally understood my condition and moved on with my life.

    I've graduated in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but I've learnt a hell of a lot about research and organising. I'm guessing research will be my forte from now on. I have so many private projects lined up that involves research.

    And no, I don't have any interviews yet! I've asked a few companies to call me back towards the end of July, so we'll see how these things go.

    Idk if my opinion is valuable but if i was an employer I would employee on the basis of experience/portfolio> degree
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    (Original post by KaptainCliff)
    I used to do shortlisting for my dad's business when he was hiring. Assuming your degree was in a relevant subject, I was gonna say yes; I would. However, as you highlighted your anxiety issue I'd be wondering whether you were ready for a graduate job. Also, as my dad has a medium business, it'd be far too expensive if you were to go off on long term sickness for him to maintain profit margins. I'd also be weary of labour turnover - it's expensive to hire someone. (When you consider the cost of advertising, setting aside the time to shortlist and interview, etc). I'd be very mindful of this when considering your application.

    It is useless, in my opinion, that you can produce first class work. Ultimately you're gonna have a 2:2 on paper. If you can demonstrate that you're a well organised individual, as you say, then that'd be a plus. I'd also be curious about what you did in the three years where you deferred. If you have three years of work experience then that would be an advantage to you over someone with a 2:1 or first but no experience.

    On the whole, I would employ you if there were no other candidates with a stronger application. But that's how it goes with every job!

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    Hey, my degree is in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but it has developed me as a person.

    There are many things I'd explain if I had an interview: The anxiety was only with study - I've never had anxiety with anything else. Work has been fine and relationships are okay. It was only a specific anxiety with study. In addition, I've never had any time off work for stress. Actually, I've probably had no more than a week off work since I started work at 18 (I'm now 34).

    In those three years off, I did some volunteering but also because of the anxiety I had, I read continuously about mental health and bodybuilding. I'm fairly well-educated in mental health and feel I can help other people now; also, I'm much healthier physically too. So in those years I had off I improved mentally and physically in addition to volunteering.

    Finally, I've worked for many years and have experience in work, albeit it's varied. I'm hoping to nail a career down now. I'm in two minds about whether to mention my struggles and successes. They could get the wrong impression and not employ me. What's your opinion?
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hey, my degree is in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but it has developed me as a person.

    There are many things I'd explain if I had an interview: The anxiety was only with study - I've never had anxiety with anything else. Work has been fine and relationships are okay. It was only a specific anxiety with study. In addition, I've never had any time off work for stress. Actually, I've probably had no more than a week off work since I started work at 18 (I'm now 34).

    In those three years off, I did some volunteering but also because of the anxiety I had, I read continuously about mental health and bodybuilding. I'm fairly well-educated in mental health and feel I can help other people now; also, I'm much healthier physically too. So in those years I had off I improved mentally and physically in addition to volunteering.

    Finally, I've worked for many years and have experience in work, albeit it's varied. I'm hoping to nail a career down now. I'm in two minds about whether to mention my struggles and successes. They could get the wrong impression and not employ me. What's your opinion?
    Any experience is good experience. Many employers value that more, when I graduated I had little to no experience, which meant I struggled, whereas guys I studied with scored lower than me and found it easier getting interviews and passing them, due them having more experience (even if it was part time jobs over the years).

    I'm not an expert on recruiters and what they specifically look at. But I would say your experience (regardless of what it is in) will help you a lot!

    And congratulations on overcoming your anxiety, you should be proud of that and completing your degree. Good luck for your future.
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hey, my degree is in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but it has developed me as a person.

    There are many things I'd explain if I had an interview: The anxiety was only with study - I've never had anxiety with anything else. Work has been fine and relationships are okay. It was only a specific anxiety with study. In addition, I've never had any time off work for stress. Actually, I've probably had no more than a week off work since I started work at 18 (I'm now 34).

    In those three years off, I did some volunteering but also because of the anxiety I had, I read continuously about mental health and bodybuilding. I'm fairly well-educated in mental health and feel I can help other people now; also, I'm much healthier physically too. So in those years I had off I improved mentally and physically in addition to volunteering.

    Finally, I've worked for many years and have experience in work, albeit it's varied. I'm hoping to nail a career down now. I'm in two minds about whether to mention my struggles and successes. They could get the wrong impression and not employ me. What's your opinion?
    If you have no gaps in employment/education I wouldn't mention your anxiety at all. There might be a very tiny minority who would respect you for overcoming things and being able to reflect but the vast majority will just worry about how reliable you will be and worry you might cause issues. I'm sure this would be unfair given your work history but that is just the way it is, if it's a choice between you and someone without anxiety you will lose every time as you are just higher risk. It won't help explain your 2.2 either, as far as employers see it that will just be a 2.2, it doesn't matter that your grades improved towards the end or not, there are plenty of jobs you can get with a 2.2 so just focus on those.
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    Dont know. WTF is a 2:2? What happened to the classic grading of A,B,C and D etc? If you could convince me you were not gonna go doolali again under high work related pressure then I would employ you, subject to a 3 month probationary period.
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    (Original post by LeeMills77)
    Hey, my degree is in Classics and Ancient History. I won't get me a specific job but it has developed me as a person.

    There are many things I'd explain if I had an interview: The anxiety was only with study - I've never had anxiety with anything else. Work has been fine and relationships are okay. It was only a specific anxiety with study. In addition, I've never had any time off work for stress. Actually, I've probably had no more than a week off work since I started work at 18 (I'm now 34).

    In those three years off, I did some volunteering but also because of the anxiety I had, I read continuously about mental health and bodybuilding. I'm fairly well-educated in mental health and feel I can help other people now; also, I'm much healthier physically too. So in those years I had off I improved mentally and physically in addition to volunteering.

    Finally, I've worked for many years and have experience in work, albeit it's varied. I'm hoping to nail a career down now. I'm in two minds about whether to mention my struggles and successes. They could get the wrong impression and not employ me. What's your opinion?
    If your anxiety was specifically in relation to studying and exams then I wouldn't even mention it to a potential employer. When you consider the person shortlisting, you're probably one of fifty applications for a single job. You get to the point where you're looking for things to turn people down on. So without question you should propably hide your anxiety problems.

    So as you're 31 with a good work experience history, that certainly goes in your favour. Of course you need to draw upon this as much as possible as this is your advantage over other graduates. Your degree in Classics and Ancient History is quite niche. However, this doesn't mean you can't turn this around to be a benefit to an employer. Explain on your CV or in an interview the skills you've learnt - whether that be strong analytical skills, good written communication, etc. Show that you're passionate about it too; it's refreshing to see personality on a job application (don't go over the top though; it's still a formal thing to get a job).

    Whilst it's admirable that you're knowledgeable about mental health and you're in good shape, it's not something I'd put down (unless of course you've got a qualification of some sort in it), as it's not really practical for an employer. Perhaps of you're keen to get the point across though, then leave it for the interview. Mention it under a question that is directed towards your personal life and hobbies.

    Always mention your professional struggles and successes. It gives examples of when you've had a problem and you've dealt with it. (Always be sure to mention your resolution to the problem is successful too!) Again, however, I'd leave your personal problems under wraps. It's important to present the 'flawless candidate' that every employer is going to want!



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