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Should I change my A-levels for architecture?

I'm doing art (& design I think, my college doesn't specify), history and physics A-levels.
I included history as a nearby uni has it in their preferred subjects, but should I change my physics to maths? (I find it easier to revise for physics, but I don't get alot of the initial concepts, and with maths I barely got out with a grade 7). I'm worried about taking physics as I only did Combined Science instead of Triple, and I might be underestimating the course.

And should I just ditch history because *most* unis don't actually care about it besides like 2?
Reply 1
If you struggled with gcse maths it's almost impossible for you to for a levels since it's an enormous jump. A lot of people have achieved high 8s in gcse but ended up, dropping the subject shortly afterwards. And yes, I think history would not be the best option if you are looking towards architecture. I think the best options would be design and technology, physics and art. (particularly if you are already if you have gotten a 7 for gcse math)
Based on your A-level choices and the considerations you've mentioned, it might be worth exploring the idea of changing your A-levels to better align with your interests and potential career path in architecture. Here are a few steps to consider:

1. Research Requirements: Look into the specific entry requirements for architecture programs at the universities you are interested in. Determine the preferred or required A-level subjects for admission.

2. Assess Your Interests: Consider whether your current A-level choices (Art & Design, History, Physics) align well with your aspirations in architecture. While Art & Design can be relevant, having a strong foundation in mathematics and potentially a science subject (e.g., Physics) can also be beneficial for architecture studies.

3. Mathematics Importance: Mathematics is often a key subject for architecture, as it involves geometry, spatial reasoning, and calculations. While you mentioned that you find Physics easier to revise for, having a solid understanding of the foundational mathematical concepts could greatly benefit your architectural studies.

4. Physics Consideration: If you're concerned about the initial concepts in Physics and the transition from Combined Science, it's important to assess whether you're willing to dedicate the time and effort to bridge that knowledge gap. Physics can be valuable for architecture, but your comfort and preparedness are crucial.

5. History Relevance: While some universities may prefer History, it's important to weigh its relevance against your overall career goals. If you're not passionate about History and believe it might not significantly contribute to your architectural studies, reconsidering this choice could make sense.

6. Exploring A-level Alternatives: If you're considering architecture, subjects like Mathematics, Art & Design (or a related art subject), and potentially a science subject (such as Physics or Chemistry) could be more aligned with the skills and knowledge needed in the field.

7. Seek Guidance: Talk to your school's career counselors, subject teachers, and even professionals in the field of architecture. They can provide insights and advice based on your specific situation.

8. Transition Considerations: If you decide to change your A-level choices, consider the logistics of transitioning to new subjects, catching up on any missed coursework, and ensuring that you have a solid foundation in the new subjects.

Remember, your A-level choices should reflect your genuine interests and aspirations. While some universities may have preferred subjects, it's essential to prioritize the subjects that will best prepare you for success in your chosen career path. Take the time to thoroughly research and reflect on your options, and don't hesitate to seek guidance from those who can provide informed advice.
(edited 6 months ago)
Original post by Hib—
I'm doing art (& design I think, my college doesn't specify), history and physics A-levels.
I included history as a nearby uni has it in their preferred subjects, but should I change my physics to maths? (I find it easier to revise for physics, but I don't get alot of the initial concepts, and with maths I barely got out with a grade 7). I'm worried about taking physics as I only did Combined Science instead of Triple, and I might be underestimating the course.

And should I just ditch history because *most* unis don't actually care about it besides like 2?


Ignore the 'advice' you have been given in the above posts. Architecture is a design-based degree (it's not engineering) and the vast majority of unis don't have specific A level requirements for architecture courses. Physics and/or maths is only required by a few unis and the maths involved in the course is around GCSE level. If you're not getting 8s or 9s in these subjects at GCSE, you could find them very challenging at A level.

Taking a creative A level is a good choice as you will be required to submit a portfolio of artwork as part of the application process. Also, design modules will take up 50%+ of your course. Essay-based A level subjects are also good (history, geography, psychology, English, etc.) as you will be required to write essays for the humanities modules. A level geography can be useful as some of the topics covered (sense of place, sutainability and environment) are relevant to architecture.

Have a look at the following thread that shows the current A level requirements for architecture courses:

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=7361710

A lot of the top architecture courses require high grades for A level so it is important you choose subjects you enjoy and will do well in.
(edited 6 months ago)

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