The Student Room Group

What happens if you fail UCAS prediction exams?

I’ve just started y12 and don’t know much about UCAS or uni application or anything atm. We sit UCAS prediction exams in June, I’m assuming this is the same or similar for all sixth forms? Are they AS exams? Just thinking worst case scenario but what happens if u don’t do as well in them as u want? And can ur predicted grades be set higher than what u achieve in the exams? Like say u achieve a B in a subject, could they set ur predicted grade as like an A or A*, or would it be a B? Thanks
You need to ask your school this question. Every school/college runs things differently when it comes to mocks and predicting grades
Original post by user01906002
I’ve just started y12 and don’t know much about UCAS or uni application or anything atm. We sit UCAS prediction exams in June, I’m assuming this is the same or similar for all sixth forms? Are they AS exams? Just thinking worst case scenario but what happens if u don’t do as well in them as u want? And can ur predicted grades be set higher than what u achieve in the exams? Like say u achieve a B in a subject, could they set ur predicted grade as like an A or A*, or would it be a B? Thanks

AS exams are taken in Wales, Northern Ireland and overseas students and form part of the overall marks in those countries. England has moved away from these and rarely puts students in for these. Schools still call them AS exams but these are not formal and dont form part of your final mark.

As for marks being upgraded that is a matter for each school to decide. They should predict what they believe a student will achieve. However this isnt always the case and some schools make totally unrealistic predictions. This is why 75% of students dont achieve their grades. Universities are aware of this.

Even if your school makes higher predictions universities expect you to achieve these. If you dont they might reject you on results day so the excessive prediction sometimes works against their students.
Reply 3
Grades given are different per school however, your predicted grades come from your end of year 12 mocks, they are averaged to calculate your predicted grades. (That's a fact)

However, if you want your predicted grades higher than there are (for e.g you're predicted a B but want a A) then you have to persuade your teachers.

That is long story cut short, as well as that you must have done your personal statement over the summer so then when you enter year 13 you can submit your UCAS application that October, then you will find out if you got an offer or not on January.

Good Luck!
Original post by tina11111
Grades given are different per school however, your predicted grades come from your end of year 12 mocks, they are averaged to calculate your predicted grades. (That's a fact)

However, if you want your predicted grades higher than there are (for e.g you're predicted a B but want a A) then you have to persuade your teachers.

That is long story cut short, as well as that you must have done your personal statement over the summer so then when you enter year 13 you can submit your UCAS application that October, then you will find out if you got an offer or not on January.

Good Luck!

The deadline to submit a ucas application is in January.

The deadline for universities to make offers is in May/June
Reply 5
Original post by user01906002
I’ve just started y12 and don’t know much about UCAS or uni application or anything atm. We sit UCAS prediction exams in June, I’m assuming this is the same or similar for all sixth forms? Are they AS exams? Just thinking worst case scenario but what happens if u don’t do as well in them as u want? And can ur predicted grades be set higher than what u achieve in the exams? Like say u achieve a B in a subject, could they set ur predicted grade as like an A or A*, or would it be a B? Thanks

It is not unusual to get UCAS predictions of one grade higher than what you achieve in your end of year 12 mocks, particularly if your are not too far from the next grade up, but it will depend on the school and on the individual circumstances.

Predicted grades should be optimistic but also realistic/achievable, as no point in getting offers based on unrealistic grades and then losing those places due to not achieving the grades and ending up in clearing.

Quick Reply

Latest