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What should I change about my diet to lose weight? Watch

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    (Original post by xenialesk)
    I actually ate more than before, basically it was something like complex carbs in the morning, complex carbs + protein+ vegetables for lunch and just protein for dinner and protein again between the meals if felt hungry - or a fruit if it's before 4pm. There were more carbs on gym days after working out. So what exactly if wrong with that? I felt just great, lost fat without losing my muscles.I'm not trying to argue with you, I'm just curious. You do seem like a knowledgeble person though
    Ate more than before? Did you track calories before, and track calories after the dietary changes? If not, then you can't know this for sure.

    Only way you could more (in terms of calories) than before and still lose weight is if you upped your exercise levels such that you were expending more calories through the extra physical activity, then the extra you took in from "eating more".

    You certainly could have been eating more volume of food for sure and lost weight, because, as is exactly the point I'm trying to raise, calories drive weight loss/gain, not anything else. For instance a plateful of green veggies or a huge green salad might seem like a lot of food, but if you actually examine the calorie content of the entire plate (assuming its just the veggies, not with extra fats on them like butters/oils they are ocoked in) it will be less than say a bar of chocolate.

    So you can go from eating a moderate amount of "unhealthy" calorically dense food, to less of the bad stuff, more of the "healthy" stuff such that you have an increase in total food volume (so it will genuinely feel like you are eating 'more'- and it indeed will be more- in terms of volume) yet a reduction in total calories consumed, and calories are a measure of energy available to us from food, so you will lose weight despite seemingly eating 'more. This is why telling people to stick to veggies and meats is such an easy effective way of getting them to lose weight- because its damn hard to overeat in terms of calories on such a diet- because you just get too damn full!

    Theres nothing strictly wrong with eating carbs in the morning. You can do it and lose weight just as effectively, but you are likely to feel worse whilst doing it and modern research indicates (as far as body composition is concerned) that there may be a slight advantage in terms of the muscle:fat ratio loss of the weight-loss in favour of losing less muscle and more fat whilst dieting if you eat the majority of your food and carbs towards the evening rather than in the morning (though it is only slight).

    If you want to experience first hand just what carbs can do to your insulin levels, blood glucose levels and resultant mood first hand, try going to say mcdonalds on an empty stomach in the morning, and eat a mcflurry and fries, a milkshake and nothing else. You are almost certain to feel unreasonably tired and lethargic about an hour after this meal, and feel a bit **** for a couple of hours more until blood glucose stabilizes. On the other hand, try eating the same amount of calories in the morning from fats and proteins, say bacon and eggs cooked in loads of oil with butter ontop and a big serving of cruciferous veggies- you'll feel absolutely fine an hour after this meal! Again I've had first hand experience of both these situations multiple times, and every time I stuff my face with high carbs (high GI) and not much else early in the day I feel bad shortly after, and every time I stuff my face with mainly proteins+fats+veggies (which is now almost always the first meal of my day, unless I've worked out) I feel absolutely fine.
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    (Original post by In One Ear)
    Ate more than before? Did you track calories before, and track calories after the dietary changes? If not, then you can't know this for sure.

    Only way you could more (in terms of calories) than before and still lose weight is if you upped your exercise levels such that you were expending more calories through the extra physical activity, then the extra you took in from "eating more".

    You certainly could have been eating more volume of food for sure and lost weight, because, as is exactly the point I'm trying to raise, calories drive weight loss/gain, not anything else. For instance a plateful of green veggies or a huge green salad might seem like a lot of food, but if you actually examine the calorie content of the entire plate (assuming its just the veggies, not with extra fats on them like butters/oils they are ocoked in) it will be less than say a bar of chocolate.

    So you can go from eating a moderate amount of "unhealthy" calorically dense food, to less of the bad stuff, more of the "healthy" stuff such that you have an increase in total food volume (so it will genuinely feel like you are eating 'more'- and it indeed will be more- in terms of volume) yet a reduction in total calories consumed, and calories are a measure of energy available to us from food, so you will lose weight despite seemingly eating 'more. This is why telling people to stick to veggies and meats is such an easy effective way of getting them to lose weight- because its damn hard to overeat in terms of calories on such a diet- because you just get too damn full!

    Theres nothing strictly wrong with eating carbs in the morning. You can do it and lose weight just as effectively, but you are likely to feel worse whilst doing it and modern research indicates (as far as body composition is concerned) that there may be a slight advantage in terms of the muscle:fat ratio loss of the weight-loss in favour of losing less muscle and more fat whilst dieting if you eat the majority of your food and carbs towards the evening rather than in the morning (though it is only slight).

    If you want to experience first hand just what carbs can do to your insulin levels, blood glucose levels and resultant mood first hand, try going to say mcdonalds on an empty stomach in the morning, and eat a mcflurry and fries, a milkshake and nothing else. You are almost certain to feel unreasonably tired and lethargic about an hour after this meal, and feel a bit **** for a couple of hours more until blood glucose stabilizes. On the other hand, try eating the same amount of calories in the morning from fats and proteins, say bacon and eggs cooked in loads of oil with butter ontop and a big serving of cruciferous veggies- you'll feel absolutely fine an hour after this meal! Again I've had first hand experience of both these situations multiple times, and every time I stuff my face with high carbs (high GI) and not much else early in the day I feel bad shortly after, and every time I stuff my face with mainly proteins+fats+veggies (which is now almost always the first meal of my day) I feel absolutely fine.
    I counted calories even before I started eating better food and working out - so "more"actually means "more". But I guess it's the excersise thing - I wasn't very active before that. Anyway, thanks for the information, I have to think it over now as I'm trying to get back to a healthy lifestyle and now I am absolutely confused
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    Sugar, Honey, Chocolate... they are the Devil's Food
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    (Original post by xenialesk)
    I counted calories even before I started eating better food and working out - so "more"actually means "more". But I guess it's the excersise thing - I wasn't very active before that. Anyway, thanks for the information, I have to think it over now as I'm trying to get back to a healthy lifestyle and now I am absolutely confused
    Haha this is the problem with exercise and nutritional science- misinformation everywhere! In fact trying to research too much often just confuses people as they just acquire totally contradictory pieces of information all over the place.

    Don't be confused.

    Just focus on:

    -Eating well (loads of veggies, some fruits, some nuts, some meat/eggs, some oily fish, healthy oils) with enough variety to cover most of your vitamin and mineral needs. You can throw unhealthy treats in there in moderation. No need to be totally anal about what you eat.

    -Not overeating (calories). If wanting to lose fat, be in a slight deficit. If wanting to gain strength and muscle as efficiently as possible, be in a slight surplus. If you're happy with where you are, just eat around maintenance.

    -Don't eat a ton of highly insulenogenic food (mainly sugary things/high GI carbs like white potatos/white bread/baguette) unless you just trained hard, unless you like energy crashes and feeling tired and lethargic when you shouldn't.

    -A smart exercise plan that involves vigorous physical activity 3-5 days a week, tailored to your particular goals. Whichever way you lean, to be as balanced and healthy as possible, at least one session a week should arguably be cardio intensive, and at least one session a week of strength training. The rest should fit to your specific goals/enjoyment.

    This is easy and will give you 90% of the results you will ever see. The rest is just optimization details.
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    To lose fat which is what I think you mean by 'weight', reduce the sugar and carbs while increasing protein. Eat more vegetables.
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    (Original post by xenialesk)
    One tablespoon of good honey in the morning won't do you any harm.
    Nor would the equivalent spoonful of lard in calories would do the same

    (Original post by xenialesk)
    so are you saying that one can eat sweets and cakes all day but if he won't exceed 1400 calories or so per day - he will still be losing weight? funny
    Yah

    (Original post by In One Ear)
    There is nothing inherently fattening about sugar and chocolate. Raw chocolate in moderation is actually quite good for you.



    No, no and no. Better to have no carbs for breakfast, and eat them mainly at night.
    Cortisol=highest in morning=increased free fatty acid release. This +fasted state=increased fat burning. In the absence of insulin, growth hormone levels reach a peak at ~2 hours post waking up. Growth hormone ramps up fat burning and preserves lean muscle mass.

    Eat carbs for breakfast and you increase insulin. Increase insulin and you shutdown growth hormone production, shut down mobilization of triglycerides (fat) for fuel and use the carbs instead. Following this if insulin was raised too high you'll get an energy crash as the insulin rapidly clears blood sugar, making you hungry again earlier than if you didn't eat carbs for breakfast, leave you feeling like **** for a while, and giving you more cravings for carbs.

    Eating carbs prompts the release of serotonin, so eating carbs at night will actually help getting to sleep easily, and if you overdo it and get tired from the blood sugar crash then who cares, you can go to bed anyway.


    The modern diet of jam+white toast/cereals with sugar alongside fruit juice for breakfast is just about the worst thing you can do if you actually want to function optimally. Restricting carbs past 4pm is really the opposite of what you should be doing- carbs AFTER 4pm only (besides if you resistance trained in the morning, in which case muscle cells have a unique mechanism to draw in glucose in the absence of insulin that is strongly active for multiple hours post-workout- which means the carbs are preferentially used to replenish muscle glycogen over being stored as fat, assuming you have glycogen to replenish).

    ------

    If your goal is to lose fat it especially makes sense to fast a bit after waking up, eat your first meal as fats+proteins+cruciferous vegetables, then introduce carbs in your last meal to relax yourself (seretonin) and help you sleep- both from a diet adherence AND hormonal optimization/regulation point of view.
    Carb timing is so massively overblown it's unreal.

    Humans evolved to eat when it's available, I stick by that principle
 
 
 
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