The Student Room Group

Rankings

Hello. How much emphasis should my daughter place on rankings of not only the uni, but also the uni course when deciding what uni to apply to? Thanks.
Original post by TomCel
Hello. How much emphasis should my daughter place on rankings of not only the uni, but also the uni course when deciding what uni to apply to? Thanks.


I would say its worth placing emphasis on reputable universities for your course rather than rankings.

rankings are a fairly arbitrary criteria & questionable data. But generally if you do a lot of research & tslk to people you can get a feel for which unis are respected in your subject of interest.

their is also lots of factors that directly affect experience that rankings don’t consider.
Original post by TomCel
Hello. How much emphasis should my daughter place on rankings of not only the uni, but also the uni course when deciding what uni to apply to? Thanks.


Which course? Rankings are particularly misleading for some subjects
Original post by TomCel
Hello. How much emphasis should my daughter place on rankings of not only the uni, but also the uni course when deciding what uni to apply to? Thanks.


@TomCel

Rankings may be useful sometimes, but different universities are stronger for different subjects, so it is really important to think about the subject before the university.

It is also important to look at how the subject is taught and assessed and your child's preferred way of learning.

There will also be other factors that may affect your child's decision: distance from home, the societies they want to join, whether there is a placement year, the opportunity to study abroad, connections with industry, facilities etc... it may be an idea to attend open days, get different prospectuses, and if possible for your daughter to talk to students who attend that university and who study the subject she is interested in.

All the best,

Oluwatosin 2nd year podiatry student University of Huddersfield
Reply 4
Original post by PQ
Which course? Rankings are particularly misleading for some subjects


Thanks for taking time to reply. Product design is the course 👍🏽
Original post by TomCel
Thanks for taking time to reply. Product design is the course 👍🏽

In that case there is only one subject ranking that covers the subject (in the Guardian - the others all group it with a huge range of creative courses). That could be a useful resource to create a long list of universities to look at but looking at the course level data on discoveruni and deciding what is important, visiting open days and looking at online graduate shows to check the course covers the sort of design your daughter is interested in (product design can vary from commercial/industrial design through to bespoke furniture design with a huge range in between) is the most important thing.

Employment is going to be based on the quality and fit of her portfolio so finding the course and university that will help her best develop her skills and portfolio is key. Not ranking.
Hey!

To add to what other posters have said, general rankings often are very arbitrary, and that ranking doesn't necessarily apply to the quality of the specific course that you (your daughter in this case) are applying to. From personal experience, the course was what spoke to me the most when selecting where and what to study at university. Course rankings are a good starting point, but I wouldn't let that alone decide where to apply to university, as there are a lot of factors such as distance from home, friendliness of the department, ability to study abroad, ability to take a placement year, etc., that should also be considered. Also look at the modules that will be studied for the chosen course at each university, some will place larger emphasis on certain sub-disciplines than others, and some will be more flexible about which modules can be taken than others as well, so do consider this as well.

Best of luck for your daughter's university applications!

^Harry (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)
Reply 7
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hey!

To add to what other posters have said, general rankings often are very arbitrary, and that ranking doesn't necessarily apply to the quality of the specific course that you (your daughter in this case) are applying to. From personal experience, the course was what spoke to me the most when selecting where and what to study at university. Course rankings are a good starting point, but I wouldn't let that alone decide where to apply to university, as there are a lot of factors such as distance from home, friendliness of the department, ability to study abroad, ability to take a placement year, etc., that should also be considered. Also look at the modules that will be studied for the chosen course at each university, some will place larger emphasis on certain sub-disciplines than others, and some will be more flexible about which modules can be taken than others as well, so do consider this as well.

Best of luck for your daughter's university applications!

^Harry (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)


Thanks Harry. We visited Lancaster open day and were very impressed 😊
Reply 8
Original post by PQ
In that case there is only one subject ranking that covers the subject (in the Guardian - the others all group it with a huge range of creative courses). That could be a useful resource to create a long list of universities to look at but looking at the course level data on discoveruni and deciding what is important, visiting open days and looking at online graduate shows to check the course covers the sort of design your daughter is interested in (product design can vary from commercial/industrial design through to bespoke furniture design with a huge range in between) is the most important thing.

Employment is going to be based on the quality and fit of her portfolio so finding the course and university that will help her best develop her skills and portfolio is key. Not ranking.

Thanks again PQ 😌
Original post by TomCel
Hello. How much emphasis should my daughter place on rankings of not only the uni, but also the uni course when deciding what uni to apply to? Thanks.


On creative courses, the biggest factor is the employment rate. If it's high (within the actual field of study) then you can bet the university has a pragmatic, technical curriculum that is taught by industry professionals. If the course is not technical then it will be an expensive three years just for a job as a barista or call centre worker at the end of it.

I don't have much faith in rankings, to be honest. The rankings can be politically driven, just like Ofsted inspections. The subject is the most important thing, not the uni. A degree in Electronic Engineering, Actuarial Science or Pharmacy will get you a good job, regardless of the university's ranking. And when it comes to creative degrees, practical work experience trumps a degree every time.
I wish we had paid a bit more attention to rankings. My son's university doesn't score particularly highly for his course but it was where he wanted to go. He is sadly quite disappointed with the degree, teaching, lack of feedback and inconsistent marking. I keep try to get him to speak up but he doesn't want to make a fuss, meanwhile his dream of a 1st or 2.1 are quickly disappearing down the toilet! If he had his time again I think he would have shopped around for something better!
Original post by JMarchant80
I wish we had paid a bit more attention to rankings. My son's university doesn't score particularly highly for his course but it was where he wanted to go. He is sadly quite disappointed with the degree, teaching, lack of feedback and inconsistent marking. I keep try to get him to speak up but he doesn't want to make a fuss, meanwhile his dream of a 1st or 2.1 are quickly disappearing down the toilet! If he had his time again I think he would have shopped around for something better!

Hard to really evaluate without more specific information. It’s never nice when expectations aren’t met.

Although what i will say is most universities (even ones with poor teaching & admin) make it pretty easy to attain a 2.1, a 1st is a totally different challenge but nowadays as long you show up, take part & put in an average performance you’ll almost certainly get a 2.1 (unfortunately the grading system has changed to where a 2.2 & 3rd are almost a soft fail).

As such id be surprised if the institution is preventing him from attaining a 2.1, and I would strongly recommend he pushes himself to achieve that as the vast majority of graduate level roles require a 2.1 and as such it will make graduate recruitment much tougher.

Quick Reply

Latest