How to hand in resignation letter Sainsburys?

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sofia0326
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I finally got a good full time graduate job and I want to resign from Sainsburys but it's my first time quitting a job so I'm a bit lost. Do I need to type it, print it and then hand it in to my manager or just handwrite it? What do I write?
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Bang Outta Order
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(Original post by sofia0326)
I finally got a good full time graduate job and I want to resign from Sainsburys but it's my first time quitting a job so I'm a bit lost. Do I need to type it, print it and then hand it in to my manager or just handwrite it? What do I write?
LMAO

It's an hourly grocery store job. No one gives a **** if you quit. You aren't contracted at sainsbury so you don't have to explain quitting.... The only reason you quit hourly jobs is guilt or to get a reference for a next job. You have a job though.

If I were you I would disappear. They're still legally required to pay you even if you're dead or went to space.


If you feel you must let them know you quit,
then you either don't show up ever again and phone up HR or your manager and tell them you're not coming back

Or you let HR know and put in two weeks notice which is just a courtesy for THEM to replace you while you're still covering shifts but **** that cos youre onto bigger better things.
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Bang Outta Order
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I've had eight jobs in one year. Meaning I quit 8 jobs and got hired again shortly after. Never did I ever tell them I quit or anything lol shrug
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RedGiant
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(Original post by sofia0326)
I finally got a good full time graduate job and I want to resign from Sainsburys but it's my first time quitting a job so I'm a bit lost. Do I need to type it, print it and then hand it in to my manager or just handwrite it? What do I write?
Yes, you should give your notice in writing which states your intention to invoke the notice period (if any) stated on the contract. You could email it, or print it off and hand it to your duty manager. By resigning properly, HR will update HMRC, so you should hopefully have the right tax code on your first payslip at your new job. Additionally, it's just courteous and professional to give your notice period, and it saves your manager some time and effort. Don't have the attitude of the person above.
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Ellepper
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(Original post by sofia0326)
I finally got a good full time graduate job and I want to resign from Sainsburys but it's my first time quitting a job so I'm a bit lost. Do I need to type it, print it and then hand it in to my manager or just handwrite it? What do I write?
This reply is probably too late, but you could write an email to your manager so you have proof that you’ve sent it and it’s in writing.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by RedGiant)
Yes, you should give your notice in writing which states your intention to invoke the notice period (if any) stated on the contract. You could email it, or print it off and hand it to your duty manager. By resigning properly, HR will update HMRC, so you should hopefully have the right tax code on your first payslip at your new job. Additionally, it's just courteous and professional to give your notice period, and it saves your manager some time and effort. Don't have the attitude of the person above.
Exactly this.
Plus if you require a reference from them (e.g. your next job requires one) then they will give you a reference.
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
LMAO

It's an hourly grocery store job. No one gives a **** if you quit. You aren't contracted at sainsbury so you don't have to explain quitting.... The only reason you quit hourly jobs is guilt or to get a reference for a next job. You have a job though.

If I were you I would disappear. They're still legally required to pay you even if you're dead or went to space.


If you feel you must let them know you quit,
then you either don't show up ever again and phone up HR or your manager and tell them you're not coming back

Or you let HR know and put in two weeks notice which is just a courtesy for THEM to replace you while you're still covering shifts but **** that cos youre onto bigger better things.
Is this for real?
You are still required to give notice, whatever job you are leaving. Your contract will say how much notice to give.
As well as it being the courteous thing to do, it means you aren't leaving them in the ****. And if you ever need a reference from them- if you give the right notice and leave on good terms they will give you one. If you just leave without notice or disappear off the face of the earth then you can kiss goodbye to a reference.
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Admit-One
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(Original post by Emma:-))
Is this for real?
You are still required to give notice, whatever job you are leaving. Your contract will say how much notice to give.
As well as it being the courteous thing to do, it means you aren't leaving them in the ****. And if you ever need a reference from them- if you give the right notice and leave on good terms they will give you one. If you just leave without notice or disappear off the face of the earth then you can kiss goodbye to a reference.
Apparently Bang doesn't consider the possibility that the OP will ever need to interact with Sainsburys again
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Bang Outta Order
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(Original post by Emma:-))
Plus if you require a reference from them (e.g. your next job requires one) then they will give you a reference.
(Original post by RedGiant)
By resigning properly, HR will update HMRC, so you should hopefully have the right tax code on your first payslip at your new job. Additionally, it's just courteous and professional to give your notice period, and it saves your manager some time and effort. Don't have the attitude of the person above.
I literally said these... I simply just don't see the significance. It's illegal for another company to bad mouth you to a prospective employer anyway so not leaving a notice (WHICH I SAID THEY SHOULD IN CLEAR ENGLISH) is not reason for another company to not hire you. Are YOU serious? It's merely an albeit petty reason for THAT sainsbury branch to not hire them again. Which also isn't a problem. Op left because they DON'T want to work there ANYWAY. Plus many jobs don't even ASK for a reference. This isn't the 70s. They ask for dates and proof of employment often times and others are synced to a job due to an apprenticeship or placement from university... You can't personally contact a manager and ask their opinion of someone and then be discouraged from hiring because of a missing pansy reference letter. What a way for you people to arbitrarily perpetuate the corporate glass ceiling lol.



(Original post by Admit-One)
Apparently Bang doesn't consider the possibility that the OP will ever need to interact with Sainsburys again
"interact" with Sainsbury again? You're not BANNED from every single sainsbury, just because you disappeared from ONE where you worked..
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Emma:-)
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(Original post by Bang Outta Order)
I literally said these... I simply just don't see the significance. It's illegal for another company to bad mouth you to a prospective employer anyway so not leaving a notice (WHICH I SAID THEY SHOULD IN CLEAR ENGLISH) is not reason for another company to not hire you. Are YOU serious? It's merely an albeit petty reason for THAT sainsbury branch to not hire them again. Which also isn't a problem. Op left because they DON'T want to work there ANYWAY. Plus many jobs don't even ASK for a reference. This isn't the 70s. They ask for dates and proof of employment often times and others are synced to a job due to an apprenticeship or placement from university... You can't personally contact a manager and ask their opinion of someone and then be discouraged from hiring because of a missing pansy reference letter. What a way for you people to arbitrarily perpetuate the corporate glass ceiling lol.




"interact" with Sainsbury again? You're not BANNED from every single sainsbury, just because you disappeared from ONE where you worked..
A) As well as being part of your contract, it's also good manners/common courtesy to give notice. You would be pissed off if it was the other way round and an employer broke any terms of the contract, so why should the employee be able to do the same.
B) I think you will find a lot of jobs require a reference. Some may only require a basic one with dates of employment. Others require more in detail references. It depends on the job.
C) Yes employers can give bad references. They may not be able to **** you off left right and centre, but they can say bad stuff as long as it's the truth. For example- getting sacked, any warnings or other disciplinary action, regular absences, regular lateness, leaving without notice. These are factual and the employer is likely to have records of these so could mention them if they wanted. The new employer can think what they like from seeing the reference. But a reference with those sorts of things on isn't likely to impress.
D) leaving a big company without notice- you may not want to work there again after leaving, but doing things like leaving without notice doesn't just get you a bad name at one store. With big companies (such as Sainsbury's) different stores share information. So more than likely a lot of stores won't want you back (wether you want to go back there or not).
Last edited by Emma:-); 1 month ago
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Bang Outta Order
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(Original post by Emma:-))
A) As well as being part of your contract, it's also good manners/common courtesy to give notice. You would be pissed off if it was the other way round and an employer broke any terms of the contract, so why should the employee be able to do the same.
B) I think you will find a lot of jobs require a reference. Some may only require a basic one with dates of employment. Others require more in detail references. It depends on the job.
C) Yes employers can give bad references. They may not be able to **** you off left right and centre, but they can say bad stuff as long as it's the truth. For example- getting sacked, any warnings or other disciplinary action, regular absences, regular lateness, leaving without notice. These are factual and the employer is likely to have records of these so could mention them if they wanted. The new employer can think what they like from seeing the reference. But a reference with those sorts of things on isn't likely to impress.
D) leaving a big company without notice- you may not want to work there again after leaving, but doing things like leaving without notice doesn't just get you a bad name at one store. With big companies (such as Sainsbury's) different stores share information. So more than likely a lot of stores won't want you back (wether you want to go back there or not).
I'm sorry but I personally just don't care about any of this lol I've never done it, and I won't do it. The only reason I will ever leave a company is because they were that horrible in general or to me. Or if I'm moving far. So in neither of those situations will I give a ****. 👍

this isn't an advice-competition either. What works for me, works for me. You're the one dogmatising what is necessary for EVERYONE. Which is ridiculous.
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xxx0xxxo
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Just open a bag of donuts and start eating it in front of your boss, saying you won't pay for them.

Maybe throw a couple like frisbees at them across the shop

then pop behind a shelving unit and giggle
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Stumpy1001
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(Original post by sofia0326)
I finally got a good full time graduate job and I want to resign from Sainsburys but it's my first time quitting a job so I'm a bit lost. Do I need to type it, print it and then hand it in to my manager or just handwrite it? What do I write?
just walk up to your manager on your last shift and say "this is my last shift here, i got a new job. See you around". preferably do that at the end of the shift. Dont forget to wave as you leave.
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Nobody2u
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(Original post by Stumpy1001)
just walk up to your manager on your last shift and say "this is my last shift here, i got a new job. See you around". preferably do that at the end of the shift. Dont forget to wave as you leave.
Why?? Is it so terrible to behave with a minimum of respect towards those that have employed you or worked with you until now?? Giving a minimum of notice let's them hire someone else so that any remaining student employees aren't run off their feet or asked to do hours over and above their contract. On top of that O.P is probably due holiday pay. If they want to get it promptly it's far better just to write a quick letter explaining the situation ( examples can easily be found on the net) and asking them to pay the balance due.
But if O.P isn't capable of doing this, what on earth did they study at uni and how did they manage living away from home? Worrying!!
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Stumpy1001
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(Original post by Nobody2u)
Why?? Is it so terrible to behave with a minimum of respect towards those that have employed you or worked with you until now?? Giving a minimum of notice let's them hire someone else so that any remaining student employees aren't run off their feet or asked to do hours over and above their contract. On top of that O.P is probably due holiday pay. If they want to get it promptly it's far better just to write a quick letter explaining the situation ( examples can easily be found on the net) and asking them to pay the balance due.
But if O.P isn't capable of doing this, what on earth did they study at uni and how did they manage living away from home? Worrying!!
that was respectful.

Disrespectful would of been to not say anything and never ever show up again.
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Nobody2u
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We don't have the same definition of respect!! Would you like your employer at the end of a day to say " oh, by the way, that was your last shift"?? Don't think so!! Because if you were counting on the pay to go on holiday or pay car insurance, petrol etc you'd be in a mess. By not giving notice you'd be leaving him in a mess
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Stumpy1001
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(Original post by Nobody2u)
We don't have the same definition of respect!! Would you like your employer at the end of a day to say " oh, by the way, that was your last shift"?? Don't think so!! Because if you were counting on the pay to go on holiday or pay car insurance, petrol etc you'd be in a mess. By not giving notice you'd be leaving him in a mess
Allow me to educate you...

Most employers (and this is doubly true for the chain supermarkets) are like mushrooms.
Feed them sh*t and keep them in the dark.
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Nobody2u
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Thank you for your kind attention but you don't need to educate me, I've had close up contact with supermarket chains, from the shop floor right up to board. Your recommendation has the merit of being clear but it's disappointing that you would be prepared to complicate the lives of fellow employees just to settle some grudge with the supermarket's hierarchy.
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Admit-One
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I guess people really are just too embarrassed to google “resignation letter”, fill in their details and relevant dates and then hand it in.

High flyers all of them no doubt.
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